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Full text of "X-ray"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/xray1920medi 



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II Again the X-ray makes its appearance. Due to 
the disorganized conditions resulting from the war, 
there is no volume to record our deeds and mis- 
deeds in 1918-'19, but the editors hope that with 
this, the seventh volume, to again reveal some- 
thing of the life at M. C. V. With the passing of 
the Skull and Bones this book must play a double 
role, and while we have failed to obtain our ideal, 
and realize our deficiency, yet we have done what 
we could. We wish to commend the spirit of co- 
operation that has prevailed and to express our 
deepest appreciation to those who have so gen- 
erously lent their assistance and advice. 

^ If there is aught herein that might offend, re- 
member it has been placed here in a spirit of friend- 
ship, and that alone. Overlook its shortcomings, 
and take this book for whatever worth it contains, 
and may it be a source of pleasure to you in after 
years to peruse its pages and recall the days spent 
at the Medical College of Virginia. 



©etiication 

tonor for tftcir names!, fcoitl) abmiration 

anb sratitube for ttjetr siacrifice, toe bebtcate tl)t£f 

boob to tte memorp of tifo&t stubcttts of tfjc 

iHebical College of "Virginia toljo in tlje great 

WBotlti Wiat gabe up tfieir Itbesi to 

tfje sierfaice of tfjeir countrp. 



R. S. WINGFIELD Editor-in-Chief 

W. C. WEST Business Manager 

H. O. BELL Associate Editor 

J. C. TYREE Advertising Manager 

E. J. KANE Art Editor 

M. H. HARRIS Fraternity Editor 

O. O. ASHWORTH Club Editor 

J. K. SHUMATE : Jokes and Grinds 




STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 



:x:-KJ3:^v? 





IQ^O 



^tubent pobp 0ttittx^ 



T. C. SHERIDAN 
President 

J. C. TYREE 
Vice-President 



L. R. PAINTER 
Secretary-Treasurer 



poarb of ^ifliitors; 



OFFICERS 

GEORGE L. CHRISTIAN Chairman 

E. L. BEMISS Vice-Chairman 

J. R. McCAULEY Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 

E. L. Bemiss Richmond, Va. 

Joseph M. Burke, M. D Petersburg, Va. 

H. L. Cabell Richmond, Va. 

Chas. P. Cardwell Richmond, Va. 

George L. Christian Richmond, Va. 

J. B. Fisher, M. D Midlothian, Va. 

W. L. Harris, M. D Norfolk, Va. 

Eppa Hunton, Jr Richmond, Va. 

Paulus A. Irving, M. D Farmville, Va. 

John M. Johnson Alexandria, Va. 

J. D. Johnson Roanoke, Va. 

Stuart McGuire, M. D., LL. D Richmond, Va. 

W. R. Miller Richmond, Va. 

Thomas L. Moore Richmond, Va. 

L. Z. Morris Richmond, Va. 

H. S. Myers, M. D Forks of Buffalo, Va. 

R. J. Payne, M. D Fredericksburg, Va. 

E. D. Taylor Richmond, Va. 

John W. Williams Richmond, Va. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Thomas L. Moore, Chairman Eppa Hunton, Jr. 

E. L. Bemiss W. R. Miller 

H. L. Cabell Stuart McGuire 




STUART McGUIRE, M. D., LL. D. 
President of College 



13 




J. R. McCAULEY 
Secretary and Treasurer of College 



14 




ALFRED L. GRAY, M. D. 
Dean of School of Medicine 



15 



^cijool of Jlebicine 



College (Officers 

STUART McGUIRE, President 
J. R. McCAULEY, Secretary-Treasurer 

Jfacultp ©ttictvn 

ALFRED L. GRAY, Dean 
J. MORRISON HUTCHESON, Secretary 

JfatuUp 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

C. A. BLANTON, M. D Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Children 

LEWIS C. BOSHER, M. D Emeritus Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

J. F. BRIGHT, M. D Emeritus Professor of Anatomy 

WM. S. GORDON, M. D Emeritus Professor of Medicine 

HENRY H. LEVY, M. D Emeritus Professor of Practice of Medicine 

J. W. LONG, M. D Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Women and Children 

EDWARD McGUIRE, M. D Emeritus Professor of Clinical Medicine 

GEORGE ROSS, M. D Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics 

HUGH M. TAYLOR, M. D Emeritus Professor of Clinical Surgery 



i6 



^cjool of JWebicine 



Jf acuUp — continued 

PROFESSORS 

GREER BAUGHMAN, M. D Professor of Obstetrics 

ROBERT C. BRYAN, M. D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

MANFRED CALL, M. D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

W. G. CHRISTIAN, M. D Professor of Anatomy 

JOHN DUNN, A. M., M. D Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology 

ALFRED L. GRAY, M. D Professor of Roentgenology 

CHARLES C. HASKELL, A. B., M. D... Professor of Physiology and of Pharmacology 

J. ALLISON HODGES, M. D Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry 

E. GUY HOPKINS, M. D Professor of Clinical Pathology 

J. MORRISON HUTCHESON, A. B., M. D Professor of Therapeutics 

E. P. McGAVOCK, M. D Professor of Dermatology and Syphilis 

STUART McGUIRE, M. D., LL. D Professor of Surgery 

E. C. L. MILLER, M. D Professor of Bacteriology and of Physiological Chemistry 

S. B. MOON, A. B., M. D Professor of Pathology 

McGUIRE NEWTON, M. D Professor of Pediatrics 

W. L. PEPLE, M. D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

CHARLES R. ROBINS, M. D Professor of Gynecology 

WORTLEY F. RUDD, A. M., PH. B Professor of Chemistry 

W. A. SHEPHERD, A. B., M. D Professor of Histology and Embryology 

BEVERLEY R. TUCKER, M. D Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry 

DOUGLAS VANDERHOOF, A. M., M. D Professor of Medicine 

JOSEPH A. WHITE, A. M., M. D Professor of Ophthalmology 

ENNION G. WILLIAMS, M. D Professor of Preventive Medicine 

A. MURAT WILLIS, M. D Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

JOHN W. BRODNAX, Ph. G., M. D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

ALEXANDER G. BROWN, JR., A. B., M. D Associate Professor of Medicine 

S. W. BUDD, A. B., M. D Associate Professor of Pathology and of Embryology 

WILLIAM W. DUNN, M. D Associate Professor of Surgery 

WM. T. GRAHAM, M. D Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

ST. GEORGE T. GRINNAN, M. D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

JAMES W. HENSON, M. D Associate Professor of Surgery 

G. PAUL LaROQUE, M. D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. F. McCRACKEN, A. M Associate Professor of Chemistry 

WM. F. MERCER, M. D Associate Professor of Laryngology 

STUART N. MICHAUX, M. D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

CLIFTON M. MILLER, M. D Associate Professor of Otology and Rhinology 

ROSHIER W. MILLER, Ph. G., M. D Associate Professor of Therapeutics 

J. GARNETT NELSON, A. M., M. D Associate Professor of Medicine 

A. H. STRAUSS, B. S...Associate Professor of Bacteriology and of Preventive Medicine 

J. McCAW TOMPKINS, A. B., M. D Associate Professor of Medicine 

R. H. WRIGHT, M. D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

17 



)ci)ool of iWebicine 



;$dXvXi'$— continued 

ASSOCIATES 

PAUL V. ANDERSON, M. D Associate in Neurology and Psychiatry 

KARL S. BLACKWELL, A. M., M. D Associate in Ophthalmology 

*R. S. BOSHER, JR., A. M., M. D Associate in Medicine 

S. W. BUDD, A. B., M. D Associate in Histology 

M. O. BURKE, A. B., M. D Associate in Medicine 

C. C. COLEMAN, M. D Associate in Clinical and Operative Surgery 

B. F. ECKLES, M. D Associate in Clinical Surgery 

J. M. EMMETT, M. D Associate in Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. O. FITZGERALD, M. D Associate in Pathology 

R. FINLEY GAYLE, M. D Associate in Neurology and Psychiatry 

JOSEPH F. GEISINGER, M. D Associate in Gynecology 

W. W. GILL, M. D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

B. H. GRAY, M. D Associate in Obstetrics 

VIRGINIUS HARRISON, A. M., M. D Associate in Obstetrics 

A. L. HERRING, M. D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

W. H. HIGGINS, A. B., M. D Associate in Medicine 

B. L. HILLSMAN, M. D Associate in Surgery 

P. W. HOWLE, M. D Associate in Surgery and in Clinical Gynecology 

F. S. JOHNS, A. B., M. D Associate in Clinical and Operative Surgery 

P. D. LIPSCOMB, A. B., M. D Associate in Medicine 

HERBERT MANN, M. D Associate in Surgery 

H. P. MAUCK, M. D Associate in Clinical and Operative Surgery 

T. W. MURRELL, M. D Associate in Dermatology and Syphilis 

M. E. NUCKOLS, M. D Associate in Surgery 

W. B. PORTER, M. D Associate in Medicine 

ROBT. S. PRESTON, A. M., M. D Associate in Medicine and in Therapeutics 

L. T. PRICE, M. D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

B. W. RA WLES, M. D Associate in Surgery 

B. M. ROSEBRO, M. D Associate in Pediatrics 

CLYDE F. ROSS, M. D Associate in Clinical Genito-Urinary Surgery 

M. PIERCE RUCKER, A. M., M. D Associate in Obstetrics 

W. A. SHEPHERD, A. B., M. D Associate in Clinical Pathology and in Medicine 

JAMES H. SMITH, A. B., M. D Associate in Medicine 

D. D. TALLEY, JR., A. B., M. D Associate in Roentgenology 

J. M. WHITFIELD, M. D...Associate in Medical Jurisprudence, Ethics and Economics 



''Deceased. i8 



)ci)ool of ilebicine 



Jf acuUp — continued 

INSTRUCTORS 

JOSEPH BEAR, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. R. BLAIR, M. D Instructor in Surgery 

H. WALLACE BLANTON, A. B., M. D Instructor in Medicine 

O. C. BRUNK, M. D Instructor in Medicine 

C. C. COLEMAN, iM. D Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry 

B. L. CRAWFORD, M. D Instructor in Medicine and in Surgery 

E. A. DRUM, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics and in Clinical Pathology 

E. C. EGGLESTON, M. D Instructor in Gynecology 

B. F. ECKLES, M. D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

N. THOMAS ENNETT, M. D Instructor in Pediatrics 

G. A. EZEKIEL, M. D Instructor in Medicine 

E. B. FEREBEE, M. D Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry 

R. S. FITZGERALD, M. D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

F. P. FLETCHER, JR., M. D Instructor in Medicine 

C. H. FO WLKES, M. D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

R. C. FRAVEL, M. D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

W. F. GRIGG, M. D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

T. B. HENDERSON, M. D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

A. L. HERRING, M. D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

FRED. M. HODGES, M. D Instructor in Roentgenology 

W. S. HODNETT, M. D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

W. B. HOPKINS, M. D Instructor in Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology 

C. H. LEWIS, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics 

HERBERT MANN, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics 

G. B. MARTIN, M. D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

H. NORTON MASON, M. D Instructor in Clinical and Operative Surgery 

H. PAGE MAUCK, M. D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

DAVID R. MURCHISON, M. D Instructor in Medicine 

ROBT. S. PRESTON, A. M., M. D Instructor in Pediatrics 

CLYDE F. ROSS, M. D Instructor in Surgery 

H. B. SANFORD, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics 

W. R. SHERRICK, M. D Instructor in Gynecology 

C. A. FOLKES, M. D Instructor in Clinical Pathology 

E. B. TALBOT, M. D Instructor in Surgery 

E. H. TERRELL, M. D Instructor in Surgery 

E. T. TRICE, M. D Instructor in Surgery 

A. E. TURMAN, M. D Instructor in Obstetrics 

HOWARD URBACH, M. D Instructor in Pediatrics 

J. E. WARRINER, JR., A. B., M. D Instructor in Therapeutics 

CARRINGTON WILLIAMS, M. D Instructor in Anatomy and in Surgery 

B. B. JONES, M. D Instructor in Physiology and Phcirmacology 

19 



^cfjool of MtUtint 



jFacultp — co/ifin lied 



Assistants 

E. S. BARR, M. D Assistant in Neurology and Psychiatry 

M. L. BOYLE, JR., M. D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

O. B. D ARDEN, A. B., M. D Assistant in Medicine 

C. H. FOWLKES, M. D Assistant in Laryngology 

JOHN BLAIR FITTS, M. D Assistant in Anatomy 

LULA WOODS GARST, B. A Assistant in Bacteriology 

EMORY HILL, A. B., M. D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

W. R. JONES, M. D Assistant in Clinical Surgery 

W. L. MASON, M. D Assistant in Otology and Rhinology 

WM. MEYER, M. D Assistant in Medicine 

C. I. SEASE, M. D Assistant in Surgery 

J. L. TABB, M. D Assistant in Roentgenology 

A. P. TRAYNHAM, M. D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 

W. R. WEISIGER, M. D Assistant in Clinical Surgery 




^cfjool of JWebicine 



Senior Jlebical Clagsi 



Officers 



H. R. HUSTON 
President 



R. S. WINGFIELD 
Vice-President 



C. E. STUMP 
Secretary-Treasurer 



W. B. CANNON 
Honor Council. 



H. O. BELL 
X-Ray Representative 




HORACE ORLANDO BELL 
Wilmington, Va. 

"Lannie" 

Omega Upsilon Phi, A. B., University of Vir- 
ginia. Associate Editor of X-Ray. Interne Re- 
treat for Sick Hospital, 1918-'19. University of Vir- 
ginia Club. Y. M. C. A. Representative to Blue 
Ridge, N. C, 1917. Appointment Gouvemeur Hos- 
pital, New York, 1920-21. 

Here is distinctly the most individual 
man in our class. Judging from his name 
you would think he could be heard any 
time and anywhere. Absolutely not so. 
He attends strictly to his business and 
says little but thinks much and once his 
opinion is formed, the burden of proof 
lies on your side. We don't know what 
memory course he has taken but when 
it comes to remembering quotations from 
Omar Khayyam, Dickens, Kipling, et als, 
Orlando is a wizard. And he applies the 
same power in his study of medicine. He 
can give you Osier's or Forschheimer's 
Practice of Medicine "Verbatim et liter- 
atim". While he is one of our best 
students, nevertheless, he finds much time 
for social affairs and is a regular calicoist. 
Bell's highest ambition is to become a 
great pediatrist. 



WALLACE B. CANNON 
Blackstone, Va. 



A B. Trinity College, Sigma Chi, Honor Council 
1919-'20. Interne City Home Hospital, 1919-'20. 

Ben is better known among his friends 
as "Deacon", "Foxy", or, in fact, he an- 
swers to any name you call him by, with 
one exception, and that is "Curtis." 
When his ear catches these vibrations he 
is like a lion aroused from his sleep, and 
the intruder had better pick his road of 
travel. When you first look at him he 
might give the impression of a rough 
Yankee, the kind that West came in con- 
tact with in Cleveland, but he is not. He 
is one of the three ministers' sons we have 
in our class. When he puts his hat over 
his left eye and starts down twelfth street 
everybody knows he is headed for Memo- 
rial Hospital where the Directress of Nur- 
ses calls him a "Public Nuisance". He 
is Prince among his friends and a terror 
to his enemies. 



23 




WARD CLEVELAND CURTIS 
Hartwood, Va. 

"College Chum" 

University of Texas. 

Allow US to introduce to you, one Ward 
C. Curtis, alias "The Doctor from Pine 
Camp". From a physical standpoint this 
man is in a class by himself but he is 
particularly interesting to us because he 
is the last of his species. 

Four years ago he began his work in 
the dissecting hall and by his abominable 
sputter of Latin and Greek it was not 
long before he made himself well known. 

After his second year in college he fell 
into the hands of a surgeon and since 
then "Unus" has been his nomen. 

Curtis is an expert street car conduc- 
tor and has also assisted Henry Ford in 
the manufacture of the "flivver". In 1914 
he made a transcontinental trip and after 
spending a year at the University of Texas 
he returned to his native state to pursue 
his course in medicine. Curtis is a self- 
made man and we admire him for his 
perseverance. The class wishes you the 
best of success in your chosen profession. 



J. FREDERICK EDMONDS 
Accomac, Va. 

*'Heinie," "Spuds" 

Pi Mu; Kappa Alpha; Richmond College, 1913- 
'16; Fleas; Richmond College Club. 

"Spuds" came to M. C. V. from Rich- 
mond College in the Fall of 1916 with a 
reputation as a student and a smasher of 
hearts. This reputation has persisted and 
progressed with his medical education as 
is demonstrated by his frequent trips up 
Broad Street with a bunch of flowers. 
The only objection we have to him is that 
he considers himself as an authority on 
potatoes and potato raising, so much so, 
that even the sight of an instrument in 
Dr. Graham's Clinic which looks like a 
potato masher will get him all excited. 
We are sure that "Heinle's" pleasing man- 
ner and ability as a student will win for 
him a host of friends and admirers. 



24 




WILLIAM T. GREEN, JR. 
Norfolk, Va. 

"Billy" 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Rho Sigma, Chi Beta 
Phi, Randolph Macon College, 1916, Secretary- 
Treasurer Junior Class 1918-'19. Interne Soldiers 
Home Hospital, 1919-'20. 

The gentleman with the "Turkish 
Towel" shirts. He is also a man of 
mystery. We have tried to keep up with 
him, but alas, what a miserable failure, 
and with overwhelming chagrin we admit 
it. We admit, 'tis a grievous fault to 
keep thine own counsel, and this gentle- 
man is an adjudged adept. "Billy" is 
a methodist preacher's son, but he failed 
to follow the code of antics laid down for 
preacher's sons. Speaking of a man, he 
embodies all the virtues. He is the per- 
sonification of energy, efficiency and 
straight thinking, a believer in honest deal- 
ings with his fellow-man, and the posses- 
sor of a sunny, vnnning disposition. He 
is bound to succeed as the term failure 
does not appear in his vocabulary. 



FRANCIS ERNEST HINCHMAN 
Richmond, Va. 



A. B. Rock Hill College, Md. ; Kappa Psi; 
Knights of Columbus. 

The greatest objection to "Sonny" is 
that he claims Richmond as his home and 
therefore can get hot biscuits and waffles 
for breakfast on Sunday morning. Prob- 
ably if he hadn't taken upon himself the 
gigantic task of becoming a doctor, he 
would have become a second Henry Ford 
— for what that guy doesn't know about 
Fords isn't worth knowing. He even has 
one himself and night or day — it matters 
not — one crank and off goes "Lizzie". It 
was Socrates who said, "Know thyself", 
but it is "Sonny" who has put a new 
meaning into these words, and we recog- 
nize them today as "Know the ladies" — 
for they all fall for him sooner or later. 
Indeed, he may easily be classed as a "So- 
cial Lion." Yes, we like "Sonny," and we 
wish nothing but the best for him as he 
goes to fill his place in the world. 



25 




GILMER G. HOLLAND 
Holland, Va. 

"Baby" 

Alpha Kappa Kappa; A. B. Elon College; In- 
terne Memorial Hospital, 1918-'19. 

"Baby" Holland has been with us long 
enough to impress upon us his fondness 
for women — verses — and perhaps? — wine. 
His habits are impressively regular. At 
7:30 P. M. he begins to comb his hair, de- 
pletes the powder box and at eight he is 
ofF for the movies writh his Fair One. 
During the day, when not at class, you 
find him gracefully reclining in his Morris 
chair and, from all appearances, grinding 
away on Neurology or Surgery. Not so — 
closer inspection will reveal an American, 
Red Book, Top Notch, Snappy Stories, 
or some such, in his hands. He has right- 
fully been termed our Couch Lizard and 
Magazine Hound. But with all his fond- 
ness for ladies and stories he will make 
a fine doctor for he has a cheering word 
and a happy smile for all. 



LAWRENCE H. HOOVER 
White House, Va. 



Alpha Kappa Kappa; A. B. Columbia College, 
Fla. ; Interne Virginia Hospital, 1918-'20; William 
and Mary Club. 

This long, lean, lanky, cadaverous look- 
ing individual is known by the namie of 
"Hungry". His favorite occupation is 
riding the ambulance at two A. M., while 
his favorite pastime is wearing out the 
furniture at the Memorial Nurse's Home. 
It is no wonder that "Hungry" stays on 
the job because Father Hoover attends 
to that, but in spite of that he is frequently 
seen with numerous members of the fairer 
sex. There is a certain man at the Memo- 
rial Hospital whose look can make 
"Hungry" drop his head like a yellow 
dog tucks his tail. Notwithstanding all 
this, the Board of Visitors of Virginia 
Hospital must consider him a very cap- 
able man to have kept him as interne for 
two years, and we agree with them. 



26 




HARRY R. HUSTON 
Humboldt, Pa. 



J. CRAIG JONES 
Wake Forest, N. C. 



Phi Rho Sigma, Ohio Northern University, 1916; 
Senior Class President, 1919-'20; Interne City 
Home Hospital, 1919-'20. 

"Harry," better known as "Sam," tho 
he has many other cognomens as "Country 
Boy", "Coal Miner", "Damn Yankee", 
"Dimples", "Brown Eyes", etc., claims to 
be the original "Northern Hurricane." Ever 
since he entered Medical College he has 
gone at his work with such a vim that he 
has won the reputation of being one of 
the most rapid workers in the class. But 
work is not the only sphere of his activi- 
ties. Tho a hard-fisted coal miner with 
a fiery temper, he is a "Lion among the 
Ladies", specializing and speculating in 
the Widow market, while taking quite a 
few chances in trained nurse stock. The 
only reason why he is not more successful 
is that he insists on wearing trousers like 
Dr. Drum. 



Wal'e Forest College; University of North Caro- 
lina; Phi Chi; Interne Memorial Hospital, 1918-'19. 

Craig is a typical blond and if anything 
his disposition is fairer. There are only 
two married men in the class, and one 
whom you might call "Near married", and 
"It", that's Craig. Aside from this, Craig 
is a hard student, and is a prime favorite 
among certain members of the faculty 
and reckoned as an all round good fellow 
by the other members of the faculty. 
Craig does not care very much for out- 
door sports, but at indoor "sports" he is 
"par excellence". This young man, upon 
his graduation as a full-fledged M. D., will 
be well qualified to prescribe for the sick 
as he served his time as an undergraduate 
interne, and had as his "assistant" during 
the past "Flu" epidemic one of Richmond's 
best medical men. We predict a brilliant 
future for him. 



27 




HOWARD W. KLINE 
Vaucluse, Va. 



Phi Chi; A. B. Randolph Macon College; Honor 
■Council, 1916-'17; Masonic Club; Interne Tucker 
Sanatorium, 1918-*20; Randolph Macon Club. 

Let us introduce to you our pathologist 
and specialist in Nervous and Mental 
diseases. This distinguished looking gen- 
tleman honored us with his presence only 
after thoroughly investigating the science 
of medicine from the laboratory end. He 
has been accorded the title of Doctor for 
lo! these many years and, with his big fur 
collared coat, he certainly looks the part. 
The nurses at Tuckers swear by him. We 
envy him his popularity, not only there, 
but among all his associates. His two 
chief diversions are going to the Lyric and 
shaking the "pickly fruit" off faculty trees, 
in which latter pastime a certain pencil 
plays a great part. There is no_ more 
consistent worker in our class, nor one 
whose ability insures him more of success 
than Kline. He is a clear thinker, thoro 
in all things, and a true scientist. His 
Tecord will bear emulating. 



FRANK McC. LEECH 
Murat, Va. 

"Licker" 

Omega Upsilon Phi; B. A. Washington and Lee 
University, 1916; President Sophomore Class, 1917- 
'18; Honor Council, 1918-'19; Interne Sheltering 
Arms Hospital. 1919-'20; Appointment to Gouven- 
eur Hospital, 1921. 

This is our real "Heart Smasher". No 
fair damsel can resist a look from his be- 
witching eyes, tho his favorites are • nur- 
ses and widows, the latter of the Peacock 
variety particularly. It has been stated 
that some even call him "Darling." Yet he 
claims to be faithful to a certain fair lady 
in Lexington and we can vouch for the 
daily epistle. Murat is his home, yet he 
insists he is from Lexington. Why, we 
do not know. A favorite among his fel- 
lows, often a party to a joke, his good 
nature never leaves him. He is a con- 
sistent student, a thoro investigator, with 
a scientific mind. Dependable in every- 
thing, consciencious always, there is no 
one of our number whose success is as 
assured. 



28 




JAMES G. LYERLY 
Granite Quarry, N. C. 

"Jim- 
Phi Beta Pi; A. B. Roanoke College, 1915; Pres- 
ident Y. M. C. A., 1918-'19; Editor Skull and 
Bones, 1918-'19; Roanoke College Club; North Car- 
olina Club; Honor Council, 19I7-'18; Interne Grace 
Hospital, 1918-'20. 

Lyerly is man of few words and much 
action, altogether quite a unique medical 
student. Jim has never been known to use 
the usual slang of medical students even 
when Dr. Gordon undertook the task of 
teaching the Junior Class, including "Jim- 
mie," the principles of medicine, and even 
after "Jim" had burnt the midnight oil for 
three months making a complete revision 
of Osier's Medicine. As for women, we 
must again confess that we are at a loss 
in regard to Lyerly's attitude towards 
them. However, he makes a semi-annual 
trip to Salem each year for some unknown 
reason. "Jim" has the reputation among 
his classmates as a good man in every 
sense of the word. We predict for him an 
unusually successful life in the "long years 
to come." 



HOWARD LYSLE MITCHELL 
Pittsylvania County 



William and Mary College; Phi Rho Sigma; 
Scholarship, 1918-'20; William and Mary College 
Club; Interne Grace Hospital, 1919-'20. 



"Mich." is a hard person to understand 
at times. When he is not imagining himself 
to have some peculiar affliction, he is 
wrapped up in the affections of some fair 
one. The fact that his head is getting bald 
does not seem to worry him. His quiet 
nature and retiring disposition stand out 
as an exclamation point in his character. 
Probably he does not know that the other 
members of his class know him as a "jolly 
good fellow." 

What this quiet and interesting senior 
will do after he gets his diploma no one 
knows. It is doubtful if he himself knows. 
At times it seems as if he might travel 
around the world, at others settle down 
in some quiet section of Virginia. He will 
be welcomed by the people wherever he 
chooses to go. 



29 




ZACK P. MITCHELL 
Windsor, N. C. 



CARLTON MOORMAN 
Moneta, Va. 



Chi Zeta Chi; Wake Forest College; Interne 
Virginia Hospital, 1919-'20. 

"Z. P." is a product of the Old North 
State. Being an elongated, anemic with 
a drawling speech, he is a typical "Down 
Homer." In spite of the fact that he is 
most studious and industrious, he manages 
to squeeze out a few hours with the fair 
sex, and is often seen mending his way 
down the avenues of the city with some 
young lady swinging to his manly arm. 
His specialty seems to be riding the am- 
bulance on three a. m. calls, when he arises 
slowly from his downy couch, answers the 
telephone, and murmurs, "Darn Old Man 
Taylor" (this being the night operator). 
He is a great lover of ice cream and has 
been known to visit the factory to con- 
sume the required quantity. "Z. P." is a 
hale, hearty, well met chap, always ready 
to do his share of the work and fully 
enjoying a joke, even if at his own ex- 
pense. Here's wishing him a great success. 



Phi Chi; A, B. Randolph Macon College, 1914; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1918-'19; Randolph Macon 
Club : Masonic Club. 

There is one mystery about "Turkey" 
that we would like to solve and that is, 
why does he go to Pamplin every month 
or so to see "Pat" Maloney when "Pat" is 
in Richmond and even his room-mate? 
We admit that "Turkey" does not allow 
everyone to put anything over on him, but 
that nurse did who found him taking a 
history and making a physical examination 
on a man who had died while he was 
examining him and did not know it until 
the nurse told him. The greatest surprise 
of all is the way "Turkey" has turned out 
to be the "He Vamp of Vamps," and by a 
motion of his bushy brows can open up 
even the coldest hearts. Anyone in the 
Dispensary can vouch for that. Notwith- 
standing all this, we can all recommend 
him as a careful, conscientious doctor. 



30 




ARTHUR DENNIS OWNBEY 

Grundy, Va. 

"A. D." 

Teacher's Diploma, William and Mary College, 
1915; Principal Hurley High School, 1915-1916; 
Interne Grace and Hygeia Hospitals; William and 
Mary Club; Masonic Club; Omega Upsilon Phi 
Fraternity. 

Arthur comes from the rugged moun- 
tains of Buchanan County. On his first 
arrival east he landed at Williamsburg, 
hoping to obtain there sufficient mental 
development for a medical career. To avoid 
any misunderstanding let me state that he 
was an inmate at William & Mary College, 
not the asylum. 

In the fall of 1916, he came to the 
Medical College, seemingly then a perfectly 
normal medical student, but alas! nearly 
tvro years ago he was irrevocably struck 
with Cupid's dart, and since then has been 
worrying himself pale, trying to invent 
new methods of displaying his affection, 
and trying to figure out a career that will 
amply support two. Despite his severe 
cardiac troubles he has a clear thinking 
head and a generous, kind disposition, so 
we feel that his success in medicine is 
quite assured. 



AUGUSTINE J. RUSSO 
Norfolk, Va. 



"Gus" says that he is a sure-enough 
"College Student" since he now rooms in 
College Hall. Russo is of dark complexion, 
but his disposition is bright and sunny. 
Besides being a shark in his studies, he is 
also a past master with the cue stick. The 
only fault he has to find with college work 
is that there are six early nine o'clock 
clinics and it certainly goes against the 
grain for him to get to them on time. The 
noon hour is more to his taste and he is 
never absent from any of these. Aside 
from this, Russo is a fine fellow and well 
thought of by his classmates. 



31 




J. WILLIAM SHAWVER 
Burke's Garden, Va. 

"Shaver" 

B. A. Roanoke College, 1915; Phi Beta Pi; Ex- 
change Editor, Skull and Bones, 1919; Vice-Presi- 
dent Class 1918-19; Interne Retreat for the Sick, 
1918-'20; Roanoke College Club. 

This long, lean, lanky Virginian hails 
from the Southwest where the hills roll 
and the blue grass grows. He is as windy 
as the breeze that sweeps over those hills, 
has a step as quick as the rabbit's, and is 
as changeable as that delightful weather. 
He is a persistent and diligent student and 
never fails to make good. Another char- 
acteristic of him is that he is always 
planning and thinking of big things. 
Probably it is not generally known, but it 
is a fact, that he is in love. 

Shawver has been with us for only three 
years, having dropped out of college a 
year and entering our class in 1917. He 
has a personality of his own and one that 
is not unpleasant to the public. In addi- 
tion to this he is a steady and earnest 
worker, and there is no doubt but that he 
will make a good addition to the medical 
profession. 



THOMAS C. SHERIDAN 
Lorain, Ohio 



Phi Rho Sigma; Theta Nu Epsilon ; B. S. Ohio 
Northern University, 1916; President Student Body 
1919-'20; President Junior Class, 1918-'19; Vice- 
President Freshman Class, 1916-17; Masonic Club. 

Born, bred and reared in that Northern 
clime, where drifts pile high and the cold 
winds blow, and a real man — is Sheridan. 
When asked why he was persuaded to 
cast his lot in the Simny South, he gives 
you nothing but a sour grin — but- we 
wonder whether or not some husky police 
squad had something to do with it. When 
the class of 1920 managed to edge them- 
selves into the Junior Order and looked 
around for a president, Sheridan was their 
man, and when the Student Body wanted 
someone to take the helm and manage 
their affairs, it was Sheridan whom they 
selected. His mother named him, but 
Cupid claimed him. A tremendously big- 
hearted friend, we have found him a man 
destined thru the power of his efficiency 
and the charm of his personality, to fill a 
place of great usefulness in the world of 
medicine. It is enough to say that we are 
proud of him. 



32 




JAMES E. SMITH 
WUson, N. C. 



Chi Zeta Chi; Atlantic Christian College, 1913; 
University North Carolina, 1916; Columbia Uni- 
versity Summer School, 1918; President North Car- 
olina Club; Interne Virginia Hospital, 1919. 

"Smittie" hails from the "land of the 
Long Leaf Pine." This genial son of Caro- 
lina might well be placed in the Epicurean 
class of humanity, for it is a foregone 
conclusion among those who know him 
that he is a confirmed disciple of that 
doctrine, "All work and no play makes 
Jack a dull boy." But, alas, for this Car- 
olina boy, the vampire of his class, for 
better or for worse his fate was sealed 
the day he fell under the spell of the 
Superintendent of the operating room at 
Virginia Hospital. Just how this little 
Vamp vamped this Vamper — how she pre- 
vailed upon him to forsake single bliss 
and assume the quiet life of a married man 
is a question for Old Maids of future 
generations to solve. In all seriousness. 
Smith is a bright student and a better 
disposed and more congenial classmate 
cannot be foimd. 



INNIS STEINMETZ 
Hamilton, Canada 

"Spinach" 
B. A. University of Toronto. 

The population of the world was in- 
creased by one January 22, 1893, but it 
will have small chance of holding its own 
after June 1, 1920 if Doctor Steinmetz 
continues to prescribe 20-grain capsules of 
Sodium Bicarbonate. Miss Steinmetz 
started her medical work at the University 
of Toronto, and for some reason, which 
we have for two years tried in vain to 
ascertain, decided to come to a warmer 
climate and landed successfully at Hope- 
well. By teaching school there a year she 
was duly qualified to ented M. C. V., and 
perhaps it was from this that she acquired 
her habit of relating to the co-eds of other 
departments the dark mysteries of medi- 
cine. She will have the distinction of 
being the first woman to receive a degree 
of Doctor of Medicine from the Medical 
College of Virginia and we trust that 
thru her the wisdom of such a marked 
departure from ancient custom will be 
demonstrated. 



33 




CLAUDE E. STUMP 
Pocahontas, Va. 

"Claude" 

Phi Chi; Theta Nu Epsilon ; University of Vir- 
ginia; Secretary-Treasurer Senior Class; Mexican 
Border Service; University of Virginia Club; In- 
terne St. Elizabeth Hospital, 1919-'20. 

Claude entered the Medical College in 
the good old days before that historic 
November the first, his natural habitat 
being among the peaks and valleys of 
Southvrest Virginia where the rights of 
man are jealously guarded, so when Villa 
started his depredations his mountain ire 
was aroused and off to the Border he went. 
Villa has not been seen since. This was 
of small importance compared to the 
"Battle of Beuna Vista" in the "War of 
the Flu" where it is stated that many 
hearts were broken and that famous 
phrase, "Why Girls Leave Home" was 
coined. His fame became so widespread 
that he was summoned to St. Elizabeth 
Hospital for further usefulness. But why 
speak further, he is a man of parts as you 
may see, and success is bound to come, 
regardless of how the dice may roll. 



W. CLYDE WEST 
Vesta, Va. 



Phi Rho Sigma, William and Mary College, 
1916; Business Manager Skull and Bones, 1918-'19; 
Business Manager X-Ray, 1920; Interne City Jail 
Hospital, 1919-'20; Fleas. 

He comes from Patrick County, but we 
cannot hold that against him. We have 
often wondered what made Patrick County 
predisposing to City Jails, but suppose the 
atmosphere of these two locations must 
be similar. The possessor of an intuition 
for business principles, he made a paying 
proposition out of an heretofore defunct 
college paper. When the senior classes 
were looking for a man to manage the 
business end of the 1920 X-Ray, West 
was unanimously chosen to fill the place. 
Knowing him to be a diagnostician of no 
mean repute, someone has suggested that 
he use the art of percussion and elicit a 
few tjrmpanitic notes on the craniums of 
these parasites on the tail of progress, 
those none too willing advertisers who 
seek to block his efforts. We predict a 
successful career for West, as few physi- 
cians can boast of rare business judgment 
coupled with a working knowledge of 
medicine. 



34 




RUSSELL S. WINGFIELD 
Richmond, Va. 



B. A. of Richmond College, 1914; Pi Kappa Alpha; 
Fleas; Interne Sheltering Arms Hospital, 1919-20; Vice-Pr 
and Bones, 1918; Editor-in-Chief X-Ray, 1920; Instructor ii 



Pi Mu; Member of the Masonic Club and 
sident Senior Class; Associate Editor Skull 
Chatham Training School, 1914-'16. 



"Wing" hails from the historic city of the Byrds on the banks of the James which 
place he rarely leaves except for his q.4.m. trips to Chatham, due, we presume, to his 
interest in the school there. While at Richmond College he took an active interest in 
athletics in which he played no small role, being a member of the Track Team of 1914. 
His naturally sunny and genial disposition makes him a prime favorite not only among 
his associates at college, but among the fair sex as well. He has a capacity for work 
unequalled by any man in school. During the recent "Draft" he served as Secretary of 
one of the Local Boards, filling that office in a manner which brought forth most 
favorable criticism from the Adjutant General's Office and at the same time his quiz 
marks were hovering around the top notch. He possesses a combination of ability, 
scholarship and "horse sense" rarely found in these days. We predict that he will be 
highly successful in his chosen profession, an honor to his class, and a credit to his 
college. 



35 



3n JWemorp 

of 
®m Pelobeb ^eacfjer anb Jfrtenb 

Eofaert ^, Posifter, Jr., Jl, 

©icb, fulp 20, 1919 
^SC 45 pcarg 



36 




POSING 



37 




38 



Junior iilebital Clags( 

CLASS OFFICERS 

W. B. McCUTCHEN 
President 

R. F. GILLESPIE 
Vice-President 

E. N. SHOCKLEY 
Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. IRVIN 
Honor Council 

A. M. KIMBROUGH 
X-Ray Representative 

CLASS ROLL 



Ashworth, O. O. 
Aycock, F. M. 
Carr, A. B. 
Casalduc, F. J. 
Claud, H. L. 
Cochran, C. C. 
Creekmur, R. L. 
Davis, J. M. 
Davis, T. D. 
Doss, R. R. 
Gillespie, R. F. 
Hornbarger, I. T. 
Irvin, C. M. 
Kimbrough, A. M. 



Langston, H. J 
Maloney, G. R. 
McCutchen, W. 
Pearman, T. B. 
Pifer, H. I. 
Putney, C. W. 
Richardson, J. K. 
Robertson, P. A. 
Shockley, E. N. 
Shumate, J. K. 
Stratford, A. L. 
Wall, H. A. 
Whitmore, W. H 
Wood, R. H. 



B. 



39 



funior ilebital Clags; IS^i^toxv 



^^^^^3 HE class of '21 returned in September, sonie from the office, some 
mbKV^^ from play, and some from the growing of cross-eyed peas and 
cK3L^Jr^ carbonated watermelons. All were fresh, some entirely too much 
^^HS^Sii so — all have continued to increase. As with other classes, we 
have lost from our ranks ; one changed schools, another was so 
slow that he got in too late, while the third decided that his knowledge of 
English could easier charm the natives of Pernambuco, Brazil, than it could 
lure the elusive germ of medical knowledge — thereby we lost Azevedo. 
Though we have lost we have gained, for added to our ranks were the number 
of four, all good men. 

Our history is brief. Rather should we be known by our characteristics 
than by our achievements, tho of the latter we are proud. Proud because 
we are good ; good because we are unique ; unique in that we are good. Our 
history is made up of hard work. We do not boast of it, nor yet do we deny 
it, for it is but a means to an end. Humanly, we like to be the best, but for 
the sake of the end towards which we strive — to alleviate as we may the ills 
to which the flesh is heir, we hope that those who follow may surpass us. 
Howbeit, they had better get a running start. 

As fledgling freshies we thought we were good; as sophistocated sophs 
we knew it ; but now as judicious juniors our belief has become a little ataxic. 
As we entered the first two years we thought we were in the hardest years. 
This year we know it. Not because we have been told so, but because we 
know that it is impossible for a schedule committee to crowd more into one 
year. We beg to suggest that these worthy gentlemen have missed their 
calling — they should have been sardine packers. There was a time, spoken of 
now in hushed voices, when a trip to Murphy's basement would make such 
things as a Junior ticket of infinitesimal import. But woe's me, and also alas, 
for times have changed, and contrasted to our present possibilities an Egyp- 
tian mummy is waterlogged, and Death Valley a turbulent sea. We can't 
be worried, however, over how much we've got to do — we're too doggone 
busy worrying over how much we've left undone. Nevertheless none of us 
have ever flunked — the prof always did that for us. 



40 



Our fields of endeavor are many; our achievements equal our attempts. 
Ashworth is interned. The undertaker, at least, has faith in him, judging 
by the Xmas candy he sent. 

Aycock's latest achievement is a bouncing daughter and heir. 
Carr is our bubo specialist — drainage guaranteed. 

Since Dr. La Roque caught Casalduc doing the hula-hula he insists that 
"Due" comes from the South Sea islands. We won't dispute it. 

Claud sell suits — "neat but not gaudy." 

Cochran was chased by a mad snail recently — he barely managed to 
escape. 

Creekmur, the human hair brush, has at last achieved a part of a part. 

J. Davis is the proud possessor of a chest that baffles even our champion 
rale chaser. Wood, who has never failed to find something more in a chest 
than the instructor. 

T. Davis is getting fat and prosperous looking. He recently became a 
neurologist. 

Doss is our gunman — shortarms a specialty. 

Gillespie can be counted on to second any protest, whether for more work 
or less work, free liquor or no liquor. It makes no difference to "Doc," one 
kick is as good as another. 

"Doc's" only opposition is "Bill Taft" Pifer, for Pifer will argue any 
subject, either side, just so he can argue. 

If you've got it, don't send your smear to Hornbarger. Intracellular 
^'dips" are his hobby, not, however, that he has got them on the brain. 

Irvin is our osteologist. If there are any "points" of interest on a bone 
that he doesn't know they haven't been found yet. 

Kimbrough insists that brainy men write unintelligibly. We notice 
that such remarks are always prompted by the prof's notation "Handwriting 
poor and hard to read." 

Langston boasts of four things — A wife and three kids. 

Maloney is a rare bird — a medical student who has never been heard to 
argue. 

41 



Love is to McCutchen as inseparable as fleas are to the Physiology Lab- 
oratory, and like the laboratory fleas, there is a new one every day. . 

Pearman's favorite song is "Pearman came in late, Doctor." 

Putney has recently contributed a volume of his personal experiences 
entitled: "Cardiac Synchronism," or "How Two Hearts Beat As One." 

Speaking of nerve, we have got the acme of such. In witness : Shockley 
took advantage of the Xmas holidays to unite himself in blissful wedlock. 

Shumate is best known by his smoke. Not that he is fast, but rather 
because he wears a pipe so big that it obscures even his personality. 

Snead finds nothing so restful as Dr. Sanford's lectures — he proves it 
by sleeping through them all. 

Stratford is our new dispensary chief. To be sure he elected himself, 
but be patient, you don't have but two hours of dispensary. 

Take Sr. Sarsaparilla from Wall and you have lost a good prescription 
man. 

Whitmore's favorite pastime is measuring a Baudelocque — from symphi- 
sis pubis to sacrum. 

Robertson used to think a twenty mile hike with a sixty pound pack quite 
a job. Since September he has begun to realize what a snap he had. 

But why rave further. Our history is written in our future. Let us 
then be up and doing, that we may continue our path onward to our goal, 
knowing that every man is rewarded just in so much as he deserves, never 
less, often more. Let us use our God-given faculties as we should, that our 
prayers to our Maker may be our great deeds, and the world may be the 
better for our having lived in it. 

HISTORIAN. 



42 




I WON'T WORKERS 



43 




SOPHOMORE MEDICAL CLASS 



44 



^opfjomore ilebital Clasg 



CLASS OFFICERS 

C. M. CARAVATI 

President 

T. M. WINN 
Vice-President 

M. H. HARRIS 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. B. LOVING 
Honor Council 

B. P. SEWARD 
X-Ray Representative 



CLASS ROLL 



Caravati, C. M. 
Coates, Joseph 
Crawford, W. J. 
Gline, R. F. 
Dickerson, W. E. 
Emy, Saburo 
Fox, P. G. 
Gardner, W. R. 
Gwin, Miss Alva 

Harrington, R. H. 

Harris, M. H. 

Haynes, W. R. 

Hileman, S. P. 

Isaacs, R. P. 



Kane, E. J. 
Loving, J. B. 
Murry, D. O. 
Nofsinger, C. D. 
Nolting, Miss M. 
Ozlin, W. J. 
Parson, G. W. 
Robertson, J. C. 
Sawyer, L. L. 
Seward, B. P. 
Snead, L. O. 
Whitaker, P. F. 
Winn, T. M. 
Woods, J. B., Jr. 



45 




|EM0RABLE is the day, September 18, 1918, when we matricu- 
lated at the Medical College of Virginia, during the most crucial 
days of the world's greatest war. With new conceptions of life, 
we came for the purpose of preparing ourselves in the best pos- 
sible way for the work we had chosen to do. Soon we were in- 
ducted into the S. A. T. C, thus doing our "bit" for our country at the same 
time we were preparing to serve human needs in a larger way in years to 
come. For two months we lived a military life. Then the S. A. T. C. was 
demobilized, and we resolved to do better work in our classes. "Toot your 
own horn for verily it shall be tooted," and the class of 1922 was determined 
to toot it. 



In order to grasp the fundamentals of anatomy we had a continuous 
struggle in the dissecting hall. But we believe we succeeded in grasping 
them as attested by the fact that Dr. Christian said that we passed the "Prac- 
ticals" most satisfactorily. In connection with the dissecting hall, memories 
of Dr. Brodnax, who, with his roll book would come in at exactly two o'clock 
saying, "Answer to your names at your tables," and again at eight minutes 
to four, repeating his characteristic ditty, "Anyone not answering the, second 
roll at his table will be marked absent for the day," will always linger in our 
minds. The micro-organisms of which we had read in our pre-medical course 
we little dreamed were so powerful. In the laboratory we learned to handle 
them as a charmer handling the serpent with the most deadly fangs. By 
persistent effort we overcame the trials and tribulations in the first year and 
gladly greeted the vacation months. 

Summer vacation rapidly came to an end, and again we were in Rich- 
mond to enter as Sophomores with renewed spirit and application upon the 



46 



study of medicine. Roll call revealed the absence of two who did not return 
this year, but there are other recruits who are enthusiastic even though they 
did not fight the battles of the first year with us. 

Without any delay we were in "harness," making earnest efforts not to 
fall under the gruelling questions of Dr. Haskell in Physiology, or to be a 
"missing ray" in Dr. Miller's "spectrum" in Physiological Chemistry. "The 
curve of distribution" has brought fear into our minds many times. Even 
though all of us are not so fortunate as to be endowed with imaginations to 
probe into some of the theories (of little importance to the medical practi- 
tioner), which we have encountered in Physiological Chemistry, yet we have 
the ability to perform all the chemical tests that will be of any value to us 
in the practice of medicine in future years. 

Three times a week we made trips to the "Moon" where our ideas of 
inflammation, tumors and diseases in general were greatly elucidated. In 
the laboratory, under the excellent instruction of Dr. Budd, we have learned 
the gross and miscroscopic appearances of diseases in the organs of the 
body. "Gentlemen, we are giving out today two sections of parenchymatous 
degeneration of the kidney which we want you to study carefully, — but suf- 
fice it to say, the smaller of the two shows up most prettily." Thus we were 
taught to walk and dine with the many diseases and morbid affections of 
the human body. 

Our scholastic record is of foremost importance, but there is a tie stronger 
than scholarship that binds us to our college, something deeper and more 
coherent — friendship. We may have knowledge, yet if we lack the qualities 
that make for friendship, we will not have that trust that will keep us from 
deviating from the right as we go through the world. Friendship makes us 
nobler men. Sometime in the future, amidst the busy rush of life, we will 
look back upon the days when we were undergraduates. The impressions of 
a certain examination will not be remembered then, but we will recall friend- 
ships that we cherish during these days. These friendships have been 
strengthened as we have labored with each other in the difficulties of the 
Sophomore year. 

47 



It is with happiness that we look forward to our Junior year. Let us 
remember that we are step nearer our goal. As we face the "firing line," let 
each one face it like a man, aim true and we will hit the mark. Stand for 
something high and noble, for only then are we sure of our foundation. We 
will be happier and the world will be better for our having lived in it. Live 
so that our life will be a joy to ourselves, an honor to the class of '22, and a 
veneration for others. Let each year fill our lives with our work and high 
ideals, that we will uphold the nobility of our profession, and add glory to 
our illustrious Alma Mater. 




48 




49 




50 




51 




52 



Jf regfjman Jlebital Clagg 



CLASS OFFICERS 

R. P. HAWKINS, JR. 
President 

A. A. WILSON 
Vice-President 

F. E. HANDY 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. T. GRAHAM 
Honor Council 

P. H. NEAL 
X-Ray Representative 



CLASS ROLL 



Atkinson, B. J. 
Avrack, J. A. 
Babb, E. M. 
Barksdale, I. S. 
Baughtnan, Miss M. 
Batte, W. H. 
Beazley, W. S., Jr. 
Bittenger, W. P. 
Burns, J. E. 
Clay, E. L. 
Clements, H. J. 
Combs, F. 
Cozart, S. R. 
Davis, J. G. 
Edwards, R. H. 
Fox, P. R. 
Graham, J. T. 
Gwyn, H. L. 
Handy, F. E. 
Harris, R. N. 
Hawkins, R. P. 
Hening, L. P. 
Holderby, C. E. 
Hornaday, J. M. 
Horton, H. Z. L. 
Jones, R. R. 
Levis, J. W. 



Boatwright, D. C. 
Bogle, Miss J. K. 
Denny, Miss Lucy C. 



SPECIALS 



53 



Liggan, L. S. 
Lilly, J. P. 
Luttrell, H. B. 
Martin, J. L. 
Mease, J. A., Jr. 
Menzies, H. R. 
Mickle, E. R. 
Neal, P. H. 
Payne, W. R. 
Perkins, C. E. 
Perlin, Louis 
Owens, W. I. 
Pritchard, C. C. 
Robertson, J. N. 
Robertson, J. P. 
Schiefelbein, H. S. 
Segar, Miss C. W. 
Stuart, D. B. 
Trecisse, J. P. 
Tucker, C. N. 
Tyler, G. C. 
Westerman, D. E. 
White, Miss Leta 
Wilkinson, E. M. 
Williams, J. P. 
Wilson, A. A. 



Lynch, Mrs. A. W. 
Messenger, Miss D. 
Smithwick, Miss L. G. 



m// III. 




Jfresiliman Jllebical Clagg i|igtorj> 




JTigAVING reached the end of the days of our freshman year, it now 
behooves the historian to tell you of how our time has been spent, 
so that, when in future years you hear of the wonders accom- 
plished by our classmen, you may look wise and say to your 
friends, "I am not surprised — he was a member of that famous 



class of 1923. 



When the doors of the Medical College of Virginia were thrown open 
on September the seventeenth, nineteen hundred and nineteen, Freshmen 
walked in and matriculated, thereby enslaving themselves for four long years 
to the study of medicine. Never shall we forget that first week of college. 
Even tho' we live to a green old age, we shall always remember the day 
that we walked back to our rooms with a stack of books under one arm and 
a box of bones under the other. 

On an October day the class met and in a very warm contest elected its 
officers, who should pilot them over the stormy and tempestuous seas of their 
maiden voyage into the realm of "Bugs and Stiffs." We hope that not many 
will have been found "washed overboard" when the voyage is ended. 

The year has been spent in hard, persistent efforts, characterized by a 
seriousness that was even surprising to us. It is said by some that the first 
year of medicine is the hardest of the four, and we sincerely trust that we 
shall find this to be the case. We were told that the road would be rough 
and it has been rough. Anatomy presented itself to be our greatest barrier, 
and we had our fears that we would never pass it ; but now that the session 
is almost at an end, there are some members of our class that refer to Anatomy 
as a "Cinch." 

In the phases of college life outside of the classroom, we have not been 
obscure. We have given a good account of ourselves in athletics, having 
furnished three Varsity men to the basket ball team. 

Our history is indeed short, but it will not always be short. There are 
those among us who have talent,, ambition and spizzerinktum ; who, as they 
are now winning honors among their fellow students, will achieve far greater 
things in the field of medicine. 



54 



Jfresiftman Jlebicine! after tfiat, tfje JHinigtrp! 

When September's passing days 

Drew us Freshmen from the ways 

Of dissipated idleness and repose, 

Little thought we at the time. 

When we left the family shrine. 

That the "Grindstone" was the place for every nose. 

But, what with human bones. 

And, the blood-curdling groans 

Of some ill-fated Patient's mortal bones. 

We could never then reject, 

As a fdult or a defect. 

The fact which Freshman subjects did disclose. 

But the denouement was swift. 

And. as we sweated o'er each "stiff." 

And "boning" over Quizzes and the like. 

Angling microbes, just like fishes. 

From the depths of Petri dishes. 

And, with Histology soaring like a kite 

Above our intellect's confusion; 

It became a plain conclusion 

That the folks had mixed the twins when we were born. 

But — when the Chemistry Professor stated 

The class half dissociated — we swore 

That this was never anything like home! 

Yet, they brought an added shame 
To blacken our fair name. 
And, innoculated us with Psychic dope, 
Then — the records plainly stated 
That we Freshmen were but slated 
To ornament the free end of a rope! 

So! — disillusioned and rejected. 

Entirely hopeless, ill-respected. 

We must atone for Ignorance's broad expanse. 

So that now our one ambition 

Is to join some "Foreign Mission" 

And go where only PREACHERS have a chance! 

— L. P. Hening. 
55 



i:i)e Country Boctor 



You may sing your little ditties 

About the Doctors from the cities, 

But when it comes to handing out the "dope" 

Just take a tip from me 

Put your faith in that M. D., 

Whose life-line is the knotted country rope. 



He's the man that rolls the pills 

For our various rustic ills. 

And the man to be relied on in a pinch. 

He's not polished and veneered 

And often sports a ragged beard. 

While his life is altogether not a "cinch." 



He's the first upon the scene 

When there's anything means 

A stitch or two. or, just, perhaps, a pill, 

But he doesn't mind the weather. 

And it sort of holds a man together 

When he knows the Doctor's coming up the line. 

Each Night and Day he's ready, 

He's tried and true and steady, 

In Winter and in Summer he's the same. 

He's our guardian when we're born. 

And he watches 'til we're gone — 

Of human ills the Doctor is the bane. 



Where the dim light is burning — 

And a passing soul is yearning 

For just a little "faith" and "sympathy," 

It's mighty good to feel. 

With the "Doctor" at the wheel. 

We're safely launched toward Eternity. 

When for us the morrow dawns 

And all our aches and pains are gone< 

And, we stand before the Judgment Seat of God — 

We feel that of those who mourn 

The chief and one alone 

Is the Doctor, when he hears the falling sod. 

Hening, L. R 



56 



-F-QuwoWIN(k THE MEDICAL 




57 




58 



PAINLESS 

DENTIS 




S>cl)ool of ©entisstrj^ 



59 




J. A. C. HOGGAN, D. D. S., L. D. S. 
Dean of School of Dentistry 



60 



^cfjool of ©entigtrp 



COLLEGE OFFICERS FACULTY OFFICERS 

STUART McGUIRE, President J. A. C. HOGGAN, Dean 

J. R. McCAULEY, Secretary-Treasurer R. R. BYRNES, Secretary 

FACULTY 

Professors 

HARRY BEAR, D. D. S. 
Professor of Exodontia and of Jurisprudence, Ethics and Economics 

R. R. BYRNES, D. D. S. 
Professor of Dental Antaomy, of Operative Technics and of Clinical Dentistry 

W. G. CHRISTIAN, M. D. 
' Professor of Anatomy 

C. C. COLEMAN, M. D. 
Professor of Oral Surgery and Anesthesia 

A. L. GRAY, M. D. 
Professor of Roentgenology 

J. W. HENSON, M. D. 
Professor of Principles of Surgery 

J. A. C. HOGGAN, D. D. S., L. D. S. 
Professor of Orthodontia 

E. C. L. MILLER, M. D. WORTLEY F. RUDD, A. M., Ph. B. 

Professor of Bacteriology Professor of Chemistry 

T. H. SCALES, D. D. S. 
Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry 

W. A. SHEPHERD, A. B., M. D. 
Professor of Histology and Embryology 

R. L. SIMPSON, A. M., D. D. S. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry 

GEORGE A. SPRINKEL, D. D. S. 
Professor of Periodontia 

A. H. STRAUS, B. S. 
Professor of Biology 

J. B. WILLIAMS, Ph. G., D. D. S. 
Prcffessor of Dental Medicine and of Pathology and Therapeutics 

Associate Professors 

J. NEILL BARNETT, M. D. 
Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis 

S. W. BUDD, A. B., M. D. 
Associate Professor of General Pathology 

6i 



G. W. HOLLIDAY, A. B., D. D. S. 
Associate Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and of Crown and Bridge Work 

P. D. LIPSCOMB, A. B., M. D. 
Associate Professor of Histology and Embryology 

B. W. RAWLES, M. D. 
Associate Professor of Principles of Surgery 

A. H. STRAUS, B. S. 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Associates 

E. L. BLANKENBAKER, D. D. S. 
Associate in Oral Surgery 

PHILIP F. FACKENTHALL, P. C. 
Associate in Biology 

D. D. TALLEY, JR., A. B., M. D. 
Associate in Roentgenology 

Instructors 

J. M. EMMETT, M. D. 
Instructor in Oral Surgery 

J. BLAIR FITTS, M. D. 
Instructor in Anatomy 

FRED M. HODGES, M. D. 
Instructor in Roentgenology 

G. W. HOLLIDAY, A. B., D. D. S. 
Instructor in Prosthetic Technics 

A. M. WASH, D. D. S. 
Instructor in Operative Technics and in Metallurgy 

FRANK G. SPEER 
Instructor in Technical Drawing 

C. F. BOWLES, D. D. S. 
Instructor in Oral Hygiene and in Pathology 

L. J. WALTON, D. D. S. 
Instructor in Dental Anatomy and in Bacteriology 

MISS LUCY CHASE DENNY 
Instructor in English 

Assistants 

LULA WOODS GARST, A. B. 
Assistant in Bacteriology 

J. L. TABB, JR., M. D. 

Assistant in Roentgenology 

62 




HOW THE DENTIST LOOKS TO MOST OF US 



63 



Senior ©ental Cla^^s 

OFFICERS 

W. G. PALMER 
President 

W. G. PALMER 
Vice-President 

W. G. PALMER 
Secretary-Treasurer 

W. G. PALMER 
Honor Council 

W. G. PALMER 
X-Ray Representative 



64 




WARREN P. LEWIS 

Parksley, Va. 

"Kid" 

Sigma Phi Epsilon ; Psi Omega 

The stork dropped "Kid" at Parksley, 
Va., February 24, 1894. After "serving 
time" at Fork Union Military Academy 
and Richmond College, in the fall of 1915 
he matriculated in the School of Den- 
tistry where he has been persuing his 
studies and the ladies ever since. He has 
a big heart and a winning smile, his 
greatest accomplishment being "charming 
the ladies." After meeting him they all 
say, "He came, he saw, he conquered." 
"Kid" served 18 months in the army with 
the Richmond Blues, and this, together 
with the fact that he was the victim of 
the Hookworm delayed his graduation. 
"Kid" has always been popular with his 
classmates, and we will miss him when he 
is gone. Here's luck to you! 



RICHARD N. LANIER 
Fredericksburg, Va. 

"Dick," "Parson" 

Horner Military School: Masonic Club; Director 
College Orchestra. 

Dick came to M. C. V. four years ago 
and started his career as an embryo den- 
tist. Here he has acquired the reputation 
of "Sterility King," and does all the ster- 
ilizing for the senior class. He was seen 
a few days ago, visiting all the drug 
stores in Richmond buying up New Skin 
to put on his hands to replace that which 
he had scraped off. His most valuable 
piece of property is a cornet, and when he 
is not scrubbing his hands he is blowing. 
He is gifted with oratory, has a liking for 
the ministry and occasionally recites and 
preaches. He would make an admirable 
medical missionary in some heathen land, 
where he could sterilize the natives, blow 
his horn, teach, preach, sing hymns, prac- 
tice surgery and dentistry, and accomplish 
wonders among the brown or black men. 
wherever he may go we are sure a glor- 
ious future awaits him, whether in the 
jungles, or in China or in Fredericksburg. 



65 





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m 




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Vjyjf 


m^ 


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MB 


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WILLIAM G. PALMER 
Saluda, Va. 

Psi Omega; President Senior Dental Class 



JAMES L. SHEPHERD, JR. 
Richmond, Va. 

"Shep" 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Psi Omega; Theta Nu 



Epsi- 



William Garland Palmer was born some- 
time back in the dim past (he won't tell 
us the date) in the city of Saluda, Va., 
Middlesex County. If you want to hear 
him "rave," ask him if Saluda is on the 
map. He received his preliminary educa- 
tion at Saluda High School and Randolph 
Macon Academy at Bedford, Va. What 
tistry we do not know, but we are glad he 
brought him to M. C. V. to take up den- 
came for he is very popular, especially 
among the "Co-eds." He may be often 
seen entertaining or being entertained in 
the hall by three or four of the fair ones 
at once. William, though, is still single, 
but we are sure he will not remain so 
long. As far as we know, he has only one 
fault — he will talk so much at times, but 
we are willing to overlook that. He was 
a member of the S. A. T. C. Wherever he 
goes and whatever he does, we wish htm 
God Speed. 



"Shep" discovered America on the 27th 
day of May, 1895, landing at Sussex, Va. 
His prep work was done at Staunton Mil- 
itary Academy, but when the writer first 
discovered him he was standing at the 
gate of the Old Richmond College, attired 
in a checked suit and a green hat. After 
much questioning we found that he hailed 
from Weldon, N. C, a fact that he is 
prone to forget. In 1916 his friendship 
with Dr. Christian commenced and he has 
been fond of playing with "Bones" ever 
since. However, in 1918 we find Jim en 
route to France where he served diligently 
with the McGuire Unit as sergeant, first 
class, for eighteen months, eleven of which 
were spent overseas. "Shep" is a prime 
favorite amongst the faculty and often has 
occasion to "shake the tree" and gather 
up a little "fruit." Ever ready to lend a 
helping hand and with his happy "chuckle" 
we are proud to claim him as a classmate. 



66 




CHARLES B. JENNINGS 
Hillsville, Va. 

"Chas" 
D. D. S., Atlanta Southern Dental College, 1919; Post-Graduate Student M. C. V„ 1919-'20. 

Charles Banks Jennings of Hillsville, Va., has spent 31 years in this world. 
Having a fondness for mining, "Chas." spent his early youth in the production of 
anthracite, but upon his arrival at manhood "Chas." shifted his occupation from that 
of a miner to that of a student, graduating at Woodlawn High School in the spring 
of 1914. October, 1916 he entered Atlanta Southern Dental College from which 
college he received his degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery in May, 1919. "Chas." 
has come to M. V. C. for this session to do a little post-graduate work and to show 
the others how it is done. He has proven himself a worthy comrade and all his 
associates consider him an all-round good fellow. 



67 



w 1 






J ^> # 



^^*^^ 



68 



junior ©ental Clas!£i 



OFFICERS 

W. H. HANKINS 
President 

J. C. TYREE 
Vice-President 

T. W. PUMPHREY 
Secretary-Treasurer 

W. R. CLINE 
Honor Council 

B. H. CONNER 
X-Ray Representative 



CLASS ROLL 



Barnett, Oliver Gould 
Bristow, Otis Allen 
Clarke, Walter Edgar 
Cline, William Russell 
Cohn, Herbert 
Conner, Ben H. 
Grove, Cecil 
Hankins, Walter H. 



Hitt, Aubrey M. 
Leonard, Floyd Lee 
Michalko, John Edward 
Pumphrey, Thomas Walker 
Rains, Warren Biscoe 
Sommerdahl, Harry F. 
Tyree, John Cyrus 



69 







3funior ©ental Ctosi ?|igtorjJ 



r^ jtt"^5 i WENT Y-SIX men gathered at the Medical College of Virginia 
ISKlKV^SJ in the fall of 1917, to pursue the study of Dentistry. There were 
IMRT^nLJ representatives from the neighboring states and especially from 
l2^S!!£^ North Carolina. Some were called into the service and some quit 
for various reasons, so that only twenty 'remained when we 
took our spring examinations. We were very much discouraged when we 
began to take our plaster impressions. One man expressed the sentiments 
of the class in a very few words, "By Gosh, if I don't get it this time I will 
go back to making boilers." 

We thought that our hard time was over when we commenced our 
Sophomore year, but we found that they had only commenced. Oh, but the 
midnight oil we burned over Dr. Haskell's Physiology and Mr. Rudd's Metal- 
lurgy, and the mental anguish we underwent. Many a bright young man's 
mind was literally dragged in the dust and his fondest ideals shattered. 

Only fifteen of us returned for our Junior year. We are one of the 
smallest classes that has been at M. C. V. for many years, but what we lack 
in quantity we more than make up in quality. We will be the first "four 
year" class to graduate at this school, and we are taking many additional 
courses that the three year classes did not enjoy. For instance, we will soon 
be "Tin Foil Artists" in every sense of the word, a pleasure never enjoyed by 
the previous classes. We even dream of tin foil in our slumbers. 

We are talking today of that time, far off, when we will get our sheep- 
skins, and of where we would locate. Two of our men are going to carry 
the art of dentistry into the wilds of North Carolina. It will indeed be a 
happy day when Grove returns to Strausburg and Hankins opens up his office 
in the great city of Richlands. 

We are striving towards one ideal and that is, to make this known as the 
best Dental class that has ever graduated at the Medical College of Virginia. 

70 




71 




72 



^opftomore Bental Clagsi 



CLASS OFFICERS 

W. W. WHITE 
President 

W. F. CREASY 
Vice-President 

MISS C. O. HALLER 
Secretary-Treasurer 

B. L. WARREN 
Honor Council 

J. A. HALLER 
X-Ray Representative 



CLASS ROLL 



Creasy, W. F. 
Cummings, Miss E. M. 
Doub, W. H. 
Haller, J. A. 
Haller, Miss C. O. 
Lacy, M. B. 
Lyons, Miss T. 
McSparran, E. C. 
Medlin, E. M. 



Moore, F. H. 
Styne, R. H. 
Swindell, J. E. 
Warren, B. L. 
Watts, D. L. 
White, W. W. 
Woolridge, C. C. 
Woolridge, H. A. 



73 



^^M 



//// #i ^ ^ 




^opfjomore Bental Clasisi ilis^torp 



^ StS^^ i HE Dental Class of 1922, of the Medical College of Virginia, began 
IwAnV^SJ its career on September 18, 1918, with thirty-five members. This 
fw^^^lri ^^^^^ ^^^ ^ notable history, being the first dental class of M. C. V. 
l2^s^£^ to have women as students. We have three such students in our 
class, but "nobody calls them doctor, and nobody seems to care." 
Although the male students are not particularly carried away with the idea 
of having girls in all their classes, yet the girls have already proven a success 
in the profession. They stand in well with the young instructors, so naturally 
THEIR Prothetic and Crown and Bridge work is excellent. 

Unfortunately, our class was organized during the World War. Of 
course the majority of the class was sworn into the S. A. T. C, some enlisting 
in the Student's Army Training Corps, and others in the "Stick Around 'Til 
Christmas" bunch. This became a known fact, for, after Christmas holidays, 
our class had decreased in number from thirty-five to twenty-four. The final 
examinations at the end of the Freshman year killed off several, so that when 
we started as Sophomores there were only fifteen of the original thirty-five 
left. To this class of fifteen were soon added two other members. Creasy and 
McSparran, who had previously attended M. C. V., but had been in the 
service for several months. These two have added much to our class, while 
McSparran is the quietest member of the class. Creasy turned out to be a 
regular comedian. 

We have students in our class from all parts of the state and also from 
North Carolina. One of great importance lives in the large city of Elk Creek, 
Virginia, but his "Paw has done bought a farm in Pennsylvania now." 

We are lucky to be one of the two classes to have three years of infirm- 
ary practice, though we have made some terrible blunders trying to "act like 
doctors." 

We hope that our whole class will graduate from M. C. V. in 1922, each 
one with a degree of D. D. S. 

74 




HARMLESS AND PAINLESS 



75 




76 



jfregfjman ©ental Clasig 

CLASS OFFICERS 

FRED WORTHINGTON 
President 

F. P. SMOOT 
Vice-President 

L. H. MAYNARD 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. A. TIPTON, JR. 
Honor Council 

E. A. SQUIRE 
X-Ray Representative 



CLASS ROLL 



Bangle, J. J. 
Belcher, Job 
Boaz, T. A. 
Boseman, Dewey 
Brown, E. H. 
Burke, Ruford 
Caravati, H. L. 
Cecil, A. G. 
Clark, Robert 

Cooke, A. B. 

Delp, CM. 

Fitzgerald, H. V. 

Gay, R. A. 

Goolsby, F. G. 

Grady, E. C. 

Harlow, T. L. 

Huston, C. R. 

Kirby, K. H. 

Klor, A. E. G., Jr. 

Knight, W. I. 

Lipoysky, J. 

Lyons, Harry 



Mabry, L. S. 
Major, J. C. 
Martin, R. L. 
Maynard, L. H. 
Moore, B. O. 
Overholt, G. C. 
Packard, H. S. 
Polly, C. L. 
Reese, C. B. 
Rowlett, P. L. 
Sherrod, W. B. 
Shotwell, H. C. 
Simpkins, J. W. 
Smoot, F. P. 
Snead, G. H. 
Squire, E. A. 
Tipton, J. A. 
Warren, L. P. 
White, P. M. 
Worthington, F. H. 
Zickrick, K. H. B. 



77 



jFregfjman Cental Clasis; ?|igtorp 



rr^^Sjy N attempting to relate the history of the Freshman Dental Class 
V^m^ one or the other of two courses may be pursued. It is possible 
fe/jlrH> for a gifted narrator to attempt an Homeric song of the achieve- 
l^^M^j ments and work of the class, an Iliad full of shouting and the 
— noise of arms. The other alternative is, Othello-like to deliver 

a plain unvarnished tale, allowing facts to speak for themselves. The latter 
course will be followed. 

We began the year as a Freshman class, forty-six strong, a class of men 
most of whom had seen service in the world war, and many of them have 
received their degrees from other colleges. Early in September the following 
officers were elected : Fred Worthington, president ; "Duck Bill" Smoot, vice- 
president; L. H. Maynard (our married man), secretary-treasurer; and "Race 
Horse" Squire, historian. 

We have discovered men in our class who rival Prothero himself when 
it comes to Prosthetic Technics. Who are they? the inquisitive may ask. 
They are no others than "Booze" Boaz and Job Belcher, the originators for 
the only technic for removing air spaces from plaster casts. 

The Freshman class has discovered that what Dr. Burns so truthfully 
stated about the lights of Broad Street burning without watching is all so, 
and we have found that the Lamp of Knowledge extinguisheth itself unless 
oil is applied. We have chosen our school and profession and may we never 
do anything which will help to lower the high standards of either. With the 
Freshman class the slogan has always been ,"M. C. V." first, last, and forever, 
and may the efforts we put forth serve as a fitting tribute to the Medical Col- 
lege and our class. 

As the Sophomore class of next year let us continue to act always for 
the best Dental School in the South — our own Alma Mater. May she never 
have cause to regret anything we shall do. Our race is only begun, another 
class will soon replace us. Soon we shall be Sophomores. 

Friendship to and for one another we owe each other, and the love which 
has carried us through this, our first year, will surely never forsake us now. 
Let us look forward with a clear conscience and with the assurance that, come 
what may, the Freshman class of this year will always be ready to serve our 
school. Classmates, our race is only begun. 



78 



Squire's Technique. 

Worthington's Beauty. 

Packard's Dimples. 

Klor's Form. 

Boaz's Booze. 

Mabry'fe Wrist-Watch. 

Moore's Charm. 

Clarke's Shimmy. 

Fitzgerald's Homesickness Blues. 

White's Milk Bottle. 

Reese's Nitric Acid Hair Tonic. 

Roseman's "Declaration of Negro Independence." 

Maynard's Reading Lesson as taught by Dr. Lipscomb. 

Warren's Mustache. 

Goolsby's Specks. 

Sherrod's Line o' Bull. 

Tipton's "Change for two bits." 

Harlow's "Tales of the Great War at Virginia." 

Polly's "Moonshine Days, in Wise County." 

Burk's Irish Patriotism. 



79 




g>tl)ool of SPftarmacp 



8i 




WORTLEY F. RUDD, M. A., Ph. B. 
Acting Dean School of Pharmacy 



82 



^cljool of $tarmatj> 



College ©ttktvi 

STUART McGUIRE, President 
J. R. McCAULEY, Secretary 



Jfatultp ©fficerg 

WORTLEY F. RUDD, Acting Dean 
PHILIP F. FACKENTHALL, Secretary 



Jfatultp 

ROSHIER W. MILLER, Ph. G., M. D. 
Professor of Pharmacy 

WORTLEY F. RUDD, M. A., Ph. B. 
Professor of Chemistry 

E. C. L. MILLER, M. D. 
Professor of Bacteriology 

PHILIP F. FACKENTHALL, P. C. 
Professor of Materia Medica 

MORRIS PHIPPS, Ph. G. 
Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

LELAND L. MILLER, B. A., LL. B. 
Lecturer in Commercial Law 

F. P. FLETCHER, M. D-, Ph. G. 
Associate Professor of Physiology 

HOWARD URBACH, M. D. 
Instructor in First Aid 

LULA WOODS GARST, B. A. 
Assistant in Bacteriology 

CLIFFORD H. BEACH, Ph. G. 
Assistant in Chemistry 

L. C. BIRD, Ph. G. 
Assistant in Bacteriology 

83 



Senior ^ijarmacp €la^^ 



OFFICERS 

THOS. B. WITTEN 
President 

JOHN W. WILCOXON 
Vice-President 

SAMUEL WEINSTEIN 
Secretary- Treasurer 

GEORGE LYLE 
Honor Council 

W. MASON MEBANE 
X-Ray Representative 



84 




FRANCIS J. BRITTON 
Richmond, Va. 

*'Look out there man!" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 21; height 5 ft. 8 in.; Ben- 
edictine College, '14-'16; Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

Britton hails from Benedictine College, 
the great military school for boys, and if 
his work there was as enthusiastic and 
sincere as it has been at M. V. C. he left 
with an enviable reputation. His one hob- 
by is the Theory and Practice of Phar- 
macy and he is destined some day to have 
his name in the United States Pharma- 
copoeia. That is, unless someone else 
gets ahead of him with a still greater im- 
provement in the method of preparation 
of Aromatic Elixir. 

Britton is somewhat of a financier, hav- 
ing a lot of money invested in various 
enterprises in our capital city. Just what 
all these enterprises are he will not say, 
but they must be profitable, inasmuch as 
his expressed determination is to open an 
ethical drug store of his own immediately 
after graduation. 

Luck to you, boy! Go to it! 



B. E. BURNETT 
AltaVista, Va. 

"Cousin Willie," "Fulton" 

"He gives every man his ear but few his voice" 
Pi Theta Sigma; age 21; height S ft., 61^ in.; 
South Hill High School; Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

Behold, when Rudd started to call the 
junior roll in the fall of '18, whose name 
should head the list but Burnett's. Little 
did either know at that time that this 
blue-eyed chap would win fame for him- 
self amongst the molecules. He is known 
to the druggists of Richmond as "Cousin 
Willie" and is also known as a hard and 
thoroughly consistent worker. That des- 
cribes his college work also, and he now 
realizes his just compensation. This chap 
passed the assistant Board in October, '19, 
and will make the full Board whenever he 
chooses to take it. 

In return for services rendered in elect- 
ing the sheriff of Jackson ward, Burnett 
was appointed chief deputy. His duties 
are to help the sheriff in all unpleasant 
undertakings, preserve order at headquar- 
ters (522 N. 10th St.), and see that his 
"Sleepy" room-mate is up and dressed at 
8:45 A. M. Burnett leaves us for South 
HUl. 



85 




p. E. DARDEN 

Newsoms, Va. 

"P. E." 

"That's what I know" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 22; height 5 ft., 10 in.; 
Newsoms High School, '15; Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. 

Peter, better known as "P. E.," fell into 
our midst in the great fall of 1918, coming 
from South Hampton which place he calls 
Heaven. "P. E." has proven himself an 
unusual student, a gentleman and a faith- 
ful comrade to his many friends. 

He is of a retiring disposition and in- 
clined to literature, editing a "Daily" and 
numberless manuscripts addressed to "My 
Lady." Troubles never trouble him for 
he laughs them all away. In fact his laugh 
is his chief characteristic and all who hear 
it must needs laugh with him. 

Needless to say, Darden is popular and 
every member of his class as well as all 
who know him, wish him an unqualified 
success in his chosen profession. 



LEON J. FARLEY 
Richmond, Va. 

"Wild Irishman" 

Zeta Delta Chi; age 21; height 6 ft.; John Mar- 
shall High School; Pharmaceutical Association. 

Farley didn't have to go very far to find 
his niche in the Hall of Fame (Pharmacy 
section) for he lives right in Richmond. 
He says "he's from Heaven and is just 
here on a visit," which may be true and 
then again may not. Irish from the top 
of his handsome (?) head to the soles of 
his number tens he possesses all the attrib- 
utes and few of the fail'ngs of his beloved 
race. His ready wit, well developed sense 
of humor and sunny outlook on life have 
made him many friends who couldn't for- 
get him if they wished. 

The name "Wild Irishman" was given 
him because — well, just because it fits 
him. In strict confidence, let it be said 
that he has an undying admiration for 
pink pajamas, smokes a pipe that occa- 
sionally makes him sick, and is a regular 
devil with the ladies. The fact that he 
sings with a beautiful cracked falsetto 
voice, is not worth mentioning. There- 
fore we won't mention it. 



86 




THOMAS J. HAM, JR. 
Richmond, Va. 



ROBERT H. HURT 
Bedford, Va. 



Pi Theta Sigma; age 22; height 6 ft. John Mar- 
shall High School; Richmond College; Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. 

A combination of pharmacist and lawyer 
is hard to beat and Thomas J. represents 
that combination. At least we think he's 
part lawyer, judging from the delight he 
takes in arguing with Mr. Fackenthall on 
the subject of oral quizzes and Materia 
Medica. 

Ham is one of the most capable men we 
have and a hard and fast worker. The 
State Board was a picnic to him and we 
predict that his business career will be 
just as easy and successful. His popu- 
larity with the rest of the class has won 
for him a sincere liking that will never 
grow old. 



Age 28; height 5 
tute; Randolph Ma 
Association. 



"Bob" is one of our married students — 
therefore one of our best. The dark mys- 
teries of chemistry, pharmacy and kindred 
subjects are as an open book to him and 
State Boards hold no terror. He is Mr. 
Rudd's one best bet, and his motto is 
always "business first." 

Hurt has overcome many obstacles in 
life solely thru his own efforts, and we 
ascribe his success to his dauntless opti- 
mism and ability to grin at discouraging 
propositions. All who know him like him 
though some of our girl students have 
been known to call him "stingy." He has 
had about twenty months' experience in 
the Army and realizes what loaning things 
means! We all wish him the best o' luck 
as he leaves to win fame and fortune (?) 
in the drug business. 



87 




GEORGE WALTER JOHNSON 

Ft. Blackmore, Va. 

"U. S. P." 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 23; height 5 ft. 10 in.; Rye 
Cone High School, '16; Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

"U. S. P.," as he is known at home and 
abroad, comes to class every morning with 
a nice, large smile on his face and those 
who know say it is a characteristic of 
Church Hill "sports." It may not be a 
positive test but it is a fact that he has a 
strong liking for that section of Rich- 
mond. Johnson is a slow but sure worker 
and an excellent all-round pharmacist. 
Never having a great deal to say, he 
usually knows what to say at the right 
time and says it. Occasionally he gets 
mixed on Materia Medica but what's a 
little Materia Medica between friends? As 
for Army experience — well, he had 
eighteen months of it and said that was 
enough. We agree with him. "U. S. P." 
leaves many friends behind him who wish 
him well and prophesy a lot of good 
things for him in this world — and Ft. 
Blackmore. 



JAMES E. LITZ 

Graham, Va. 

"Jimmie," "Jim Ed" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 20; height 5 ft. 10 in.; 
Graham High School; Secretary and Treasurer 
Pharmaceutical Association, '18-'19; President 
Pharmaceutical Association, '19-'20. 

If he be an average representative of 
Southwest Virginia which he says is "the 
best place in the world," that part of the 
Old Dominion may justly feel proud of 
its youth. He cast his lot with us in '18 
and made the same good record frorn the 
beginning that he has always maintained. 

We could not call "Jimmie" a ladies 
man because he positively will not stay 
out after eight o'clock at night. There are 
too many deep-rooted questions in Rudd's 
chemistry to be unearthed between the 
hours of seven and eleven p. m. to permit 
any such foolishness. His devotion to 
chemistry has not soured him on the 
world however, for he is a prince of good 
fellows, always pleasant and always ready 
to extend a helping hand to his fellow 
students. "Jim Ed" is a youth of high 
ideals, sterling integrity and a gentleman 
at all times, and these qualities have won 
for him many lasting friends while in col- 
lege. Needless to say, he is our best 
student, and will, we believe, rank high in 
pharmaceutical life in Virginia. 



88 




GEORGE W. LYLE 
Radford, Va. 

Phi Theta Sigma ; age 24 ; height 5 ft. 9 in. ; 
Radford High School; University of Virginia, '14- 
'15-' 16: Representative to Honor Council; Pharma- 
ceutical Association, 

Lyle is another of the men who chose 
to shoulder a gun at the end of his first 
year's work — '17. He served two years 
with the 115th Field Hospital, 29th Divi- 
sion, U. S. A., eleven months of which 
time was spent overseas. 

George was a welcome addition to the 
class when he came hack in the fall of '19. 
His first year's popularity returned with 
him and, like his shadow, bids fair to stay. 
He is an excellent student and a quiet one, 
rarely having a great deal to say, but when 
he does speak he never stutters. Masti- 
cation of the famous weed is the only bad 
habit we know him to possess and that is 
more than offset by the fact that he 
doesn't drink Coca-Cola, doesn't smoke 
cubebs and absolutely does not stay out 
after nine o'clock at night. 

We understand George has a position 
as manager of his father's store at Rad- 
ford waiting for him, and here's wishing 
him the best of luck in his business career. 



W. 



MASON MEBANE 
Mebane, N. C. 



Age 22; height 5 ft. IOV2 in.; Bingham Military 
School, Mebane, N. C. ; Representative to X-Ray; 
Pharmaceutical Association. 



Some time back in the year of 1917, 
when the leaves began to fall, a big gust 
of wind blew one of the most curious but 
interesting specimens into the portals of 
our institution. After a careful examina- 
tion, Mr. Fackenthall informed us that it 
was of the botanical origin Wm. Mason — 
family of Mebane — hatitat. North Caro- 
lina. As a dill picker he soon proved 
himself a champion and the envy of his 
class. Nevertheless, his junior year proved 
a most successful one. 

Between the enactment of act one and 
two of his college life at M. C. V., a year 
elapsed, during which time our hero had 
a number of very varied experiences. Suf- 
fice it to mention the most outstanding 
ones. First, a little romantic affair with 
an Irish colleen at Hot Springs, which 
resulted so disastrously that he went into 
the Army to forget and forgive . . . 
the Army counting as another experience. 




L. R. PAINTER 
Tazewell, Va. 

"Doc," "Larry" 

"Well. I never thought I would live to see that" 
Zeta Delta Chi; age 22; height 6 ft. 1 in.; Taze- 
well High School, '17; Secretary and Treasurer Stu- 
dent Body, '19-'20; Pharmaceutical Association; 
Class President. '18-' 19. 

This tall, good-looking young fellow 
hails from the mountains of Southwest 
Virginia, and is another striking example 
of the good things those mountains can 
produce. From the very first day of his 
arrival at M. C. V. his pleasing person- 
ality, lack of conceit, and unusual ability 
to "mix well" put him in the front ranks 
of a legion of good fellows. Later he 
stepped out in front of the ranks wearing 
a uniform and the stripes of a sergeant on 
his sleeve, but still remaining one of the 
fellows. 

Larry's worst dissipation is a pipe — one 
of these regular pipes. Those who know 
his brand of tobacco say it comes from 
Winston-Salem and that there's a reason 
for his partiality. He is one of our very 
best authorities on moving pictures and 
the latest styles in clothes, and we believe 
that should he ever tire of Pharmacy there 
would be a place for him on the screen or 
posing for style plates. 



RAY M. PARKER 
Lewisburg, W. Va. 

"Fatty" 



Pi Theta Sigma; age 23; height 5 ft. 8 in.; 
Greenbrier Presbyterian Military School; Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

Parker, known to a few of his closest 
friends as "Fatty," came to us from the 
mountains of West Virginia. That State 
was indeed good to us, for in him we have 
represented the highest type of gentleman 
and student. 

Dignified as a judge, sometimes we won- 
der why the ministry or the law did not 
claim him instead of Pharmacy. Surely 
he wears a combined ministerial and legal 
air as he strolls sedately down Broad 
Street, supporting a fragrant (?) cigar be- 
tween his teeth and smiling kindly upon 
all the world. Here's hoping, however, 
that he never feels it his duty to carry his 
dignity into either of the afore-mentioned 
professions. He is too good a pharmacist 
to lose, and we selfishly want him with us. 
His chief ambition just now is to graduate 
at M. C. v., pass the Board, and settle 
down with his "Boo" in the valley of 
Virginia, but when a man like Parker be- 
gins to "ambish" you never can tell where 
he will stop. 



go 




MYRTLE PATTERSON 
South Boston, Va. 

"Pat" _■■ . 

"Beware O ye men; thy hearts are in danger!" 
Age 19; height 5 ft. 4 in.; South Boston High 
School; Pharmaceutical Association. 

This young lady came to us from the 
plains of South Boston, after conquering 
the hearts of all possible victims there, 
looking for more worlds to sub-lease. At 
first she was partial to red-haired suscep- 
tibles, but now we are informed that the 
color of the hair makes no difference. 
Southwest Virginians don't have red hair, 
anyway. 

"Pat" is continually happy and always 
ready to smile. On good authority her 
heart is said to be as large as herself ... 
which is a fairly good-sized heart, weigh- 
ing around 175 lbs. Av. Though easily 
excited over small things, such, for in- 
stance, as the difference between a mil and 
CO., or the need of a pencil, we predict a 
successful future for her in supplying the 
pharmaceutical needs of the "old home 
town." 



HILDA F. SAUNDERS 
Chase City, Va. 

"Charms strike the sight; merit wins the soul" 
Age 21 ; height 5 ft. 5 in. ; Chase City High 
School; Harrisonburg Normal; Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation. 

Here indeed we have a paragon of mod- 
esty — a young lady who with every reason 
to be proud of her intellectual attainments, 
decries her own merits! Never will she 
admit that her grades on all subjects have 
been even passable, and that is a strange 
thing, for Hilda is the soul of veracity on 
all other matters. 

She is a hard worker and a thorough- 
going student, even though she discovered 
long ago the art of not letting studies in- 
terfere with her general education. We 
had always hoped that Hilda would keep 
her mind and heart in Pharmacy, but this 
last year would seem to indicate that she 
has strong leanings to the Dental Depart- 
ment. Another instance of the versatility 
of pill-rollers! 

We are all glad that we are leaving with 
her, for M. C. V. would be a dull and 
dreary place without Hilda Saunders. 



91 




FERNANDE MARIE VARLET 
Richmond, Va. 

"Bid me discourage ! I will enchant thine ear" 

Age 20; height 5 ft. 4 in.; Montrose High School; 
Skull and Bones Staff, '18-'19; Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation. 

In the year nineteen-feighteen, when the 
college opened its doors to the fair sex, 
Fernande took advantage of the oppor- 
tunity and come beaming into our midst. 
She has never lost that beamins; smile, 
and her host of friends has come to asso- 
ciate it permanently with the charming 
personality of this pleasing French 
mam'selle. 

Although Fernande spent the initial 
«ight years of her life in Indiana, one 
would never be able to identify her as any- 
thing else than a Southerner — insofar as 
ber drawl and manner of speech are con- 
cerned. We never tire of hearing her 
talk — and that's a fortunate thing. 

She has many favorite pastimes, chief 
among them being the calculation of dos- 
age ointments and dispensing aspirin tab- 
lets with "shake well!" labels. Joking 
aside, this young lady is really an excel- 
lent pharmacist, and the store that suc- 
ceeds in obtaining her services will be 
lucky indeed. 



SEDONA MARIE VARLET 
Richmond, Va. 

"Not as saintly as she looks" 



To look upon Sedona now and see the 
dignified senior who answers to that name 
one would never think she was such a 
case in days gone by. She is what is 
commonly known as a gay deceiver, even 
though from her countenance you would 
imagine nothing but angelic sweetness and 
strict devotion to study. She has fooled 
her instructors, but not her classmates. 

We know her as a steady, diligent 
student who stands very near the top in 
her work. Her popularity may be equalled 
but not excelled by anyone, and she is 
known as the girl who is always ready 
with a smile and a joke for all her friends. 
The only thing which will take away her 
smile is the thought that she will no longer 
enjoy the pleasures (?) of co-education. 
We feel justified in saying she will ever 
hold her own, and we are also sure she 
will make a successful pharmacist — a 
career to which she eagerly looks for- 
ward. 



92 




DANIEL V. WALKER 
Atkinson, N. C. 

"It can be done" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 21; heiglit 6 ft. 1 in.; At- 
kinson High School, '18; Second Vice-President, 
Pharmaceutical Association, *18-'19; Vice-President 
Pharmaceutical Association, *19-'20; Recording Sec- 
retary Y. M. C. A., '19-"20. 

After spending most of his time in 
North Carolina, "D. V." decided to study 
Pharmacy, and joined our ranks within 
the walls of M. C. V. in the Fall of 1918. 
He is quiet, steady, studious and clean in 
all his daily tasks, which things have won 
for him a friendship among his classmates. 
He has been a diligent student and stands 
at the top of the ladder in his studies. 

Walker was our representative to the 
Southern Students' Conference in the Sum- 
mer of '19. It is "one of the joys of his 
life" to help the other fellow. He often 
talks of the "Old North State," and it is 
thought among his friends that he will 
return there to practice his chosen pro- 
fession. A man with such sterling quali- 
ties and such high ideals as this one is 
sure to be crowned with success. 



RALPH J. WALKER 
Hampton, Va. 

"R. J." 

"I wish I had sixteen million dollars" 
Zeta Delta Chi; age 23; height 6 ft.; Hampton 
High School; Pharmacy Delegate to Southern Stu- 
dents Y. M. C. A. Conference, Blue Ridge, N. C, 
'18; Pharmaceutical Association. 

Ralph, alias "R. J.," hails from Hamp- 
ton, a little town in the tidewater section 
of Virginia. He came into our midst in 
September, 1917. During his first year he 
proved to be a promising young fellow 
in the pharmaceutical line, making the 
Assistant Board in April. January, '20, 
found him with the full Board to his credit. 
In August, 1918, he entered service at 
Camp Lee, where, being fond of "cannon,"^ 
he tried to get into the artillery. They 
denied him that branch and put him in the 
medical department. During his ten 
months' stay with Uncle Sam, Ralph over- 
came many difficulties, chief among them 
being, learning to play the mandolin and 
singing, "Oh, how I hate to get up in the 
morning!" 



93 




SAMUEL WEINSTEIN 
Richmond, Va. 

"A true American at heart" 

Age 23; height 5 ft. 6 in.; John Marshall High 
School; Pharmaceutical Association; Secretary and 
Treasurer of Class. 

Sam is another war veteran and one 
who saw some hard fighting. He was se- 
verely wounded and sent back from the 
front, though he begged to be allowed to 
finish out the scrap. Same way with the 
stiff arguments he puts up in chemistry 
class — it's hard to put him down. We pre- 
dict a great future for Sam in the field of 
chemistry, and we say that not because 
his helping hand has proven useful to his 
classmates on mornings after the night 
before, but because he really knows his 
subject. 

Of course he has plans for an ethical 
drug store of his own. He says "we are 
going to raise the requirements of Phar- 
macy," and we are of that opinion, and 
that Sam will be a leader in his profession. 
His one chief pastime is dancing the latest 
dances and dancing attendance to the 
ladies. They all like him, as indeed every- 
one does, and we wish him the success 
that he justly deserves. 



ELLIOTT S. WHITE 
Middlesex, N. C. 



He hails from the Old North State and 
is known among the boys as "Bear-Cat," 
the name probably originating in the fact 
that he has served thirty-three months 
with his "Uncle Samuel" on the border 
and overseas. 

White lost his right eye in the fracas in 
France, but when it comes to finding 
strange things under the microscope with 
"the eye that is left," he gets there just 
the same. He is fond of music and is 
himself a musician of considerable ability. 
Hunting is his greatest pastime, and there 
is no better sportsman when it comes to 
shooting pool. 

Being a steady, persistent and reliable 
worker. White cannot help but make good, 
and he takes with him the friendship and 
good wishes of all who know him. 



94 




JOHN W. WILCOXON 
Manasass, Va. 

"Sleepy" 

"Smile and the world smiles with you ; weep and 
you weep alone" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 22; height 6 ft.; Manasass 
High School: Vice-President of Class, 'l9-'20; 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Sleepy" joined the list of hopefuls in 
the Fall of 1916. After completing the 
junior year, he felt the call of the colors 
and joined Uncle Sam's outfit, spending 
only a few months on this side before 
sailing to sunny France. With fifteen 
months to his credit in that country, he 
decided (with his Uncle's consent) to re- 
turn to the States, and, after a short rest, 
to his Alma Mater for another year's work 
and a degree. 

"Sleepy," which name he justly deserves 
on account of his unlimited capacity for 
sleep, has found time enough without 
neglecting his duties to trifle with the 
hearts of quite a few charming young la- 
dies. There is a parlor chair in Highland 
Park that knows him intimately, and only 
counts him absent when a private class in 
chemistry on West Grace Street demands 
his presence. 



EUGENE B. WITTEN 
Graham, Va. 

"Doc" 

Pi Theta Sigma; age 24; height 6 ft.; Graham 
High School; Class President; Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation. 

"Doc" Witten is a veteran member of 
the class in that he began his course in 
Pharmacy in 1915, finished up one year, 
then dropped the spatula to shoulder a 
gun and help Uncle Sam out of a little 
difficulty on the border. Then, of course, 
he was needed overseas, after which he 
came back to resume his study of pills, 
powders and girls. As the strong point 
in several eternal triangles, he is a con- 
tinual source of worry to some of our girl 
students. They never know who the other 
point is. 

Witten is one of the happiest and luck- 
iest of the "happy-go-lucky" organization 
and he carries with him the best wishes 
of the class in all his undertakings — 
pharmaceutical or matrimonial. 



95 






--■ , 


© 


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JHHI 


'M 



96 



Junior J^fjarmacp Clagg 

CLASS OFFICERS 

R. E. SMITH 
President 

W. R. BOND 
Vice-President 

L. S. SAUNDERS 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. H. GARY 
Honor Council 

MARGARET E. SAVAGE 
X-Ray Representative 



Adams, J. S. 
Andes, G. E. 
Beahm, W. P. 
Bennett, Miss H. ] 
Biscoe, J. W. 
Bond, W. R. 
Bowman, D. C. 
Channing, S. H. 
Cheatham, A. B. 
Cousins, J. A. 
Cress, Howard G. 
Dailey, J. F. 
Darlington, Jas. 
Dickenson, F. B. 
Dodson, W. H. 
East, H. S. 
Farlow, G. D. 
Farrar, G. M. 
Francis, P. G. 
Gary, J. H. 
Greene, H. C. 
Griffin, O. 
Hargis, W. J. 
Hawthorne, C. F. 



CLASS ROLL 

Hodges, C. O. 
Hood, H. S. 
Hopkins, J. C. 
House, W. O. 
Hunter, W. B. 
Jackson, R. C. 
Jennings, G. N. 
Johnson, B. W. 
Kelly, M. P. 
Keys, Joe 
Lacy, G. E. 
Leech, W. M. 
Lloyds, J. T. 
Lowman, J. L. 
Major, J. H. 
Mann, E. L. 
Marshall, T. F. 
Martin, A. N. 
Maupin, J. W. 
McGraw. H. D. 
Monroe, J. T. 
Moreland, P. C. 
Norman, J. P. 
Noveck, Morris 



Parker, R. C. 
Perry, Roland 
Porter, L. T. 
Ramsey, A. D. 
Randolph, B. L. 
Rector, C. P. 
Remine, J. C. 
Rose, E. K. 
Ross, J. H. 
Salazar, A. L. 
Saunders, L. S. 
Savage, Miss M. E. 
Seawell, H. C. 
Shumate, W. B. 
Smith, R. E. 
Smith, Wm. A. 
Spiggle, C. H. 
Suarez, H. 
Thomas, J. C. 
Vaughan, A. L. 
Williams, D. S. 
Willis, T. 
Wood, F. E. 
Williamson, J. W. 



Berry, H. W. 
Brown, H. W. 
Cochran, R. H. 



"SPECIALS" 

Derr, O. D. 
Jefferies, C. L. 
Lichtenstein, J. 

97 



Newman, R. L. 
Roberts, E. P. 
Williams, R. G. 




Junior ^fjarmacp Clas;si Jli^torp 

^NCE upon a time a host of eighty children went out into the land 
of the unknown in quest of Knowledge. Following varied paths 
W they wandered through life learning by experience and by the 
jH teachings of others until they entered the M. C. V. as embryonic 
pill-rollers. Into this unexplored region they had come in search 
of Knowledge, sometimes known as Education. 

Hardly had they entered this mysterious realm when they were ushered 
into the presence of certain Knights of Wisdom. 

First, Sir Dwarf Rudd, a man of high authority in fairyland, met them 
at the entrance of the Hall of Grind and Toil. He had two Elves, Thompson 
and Beach, who helped him to make the paths less rugged. They registered 
their names on a huge book where they will remain until the end of time. 

Sir Dwarf Rudd first introduced them to the ruling spirit in that land 
which was Common Sense, and told them to carry it with them always and 
they would succeed in all their attempts. They then became acquainted with 
numerous other spirits under his leadership, some of which were Molecules, 
Atoms, Chemical Changes, Equilibrium, and Periodic Law. They will all 
remember the huge giant, Hydrogen Sulfid, by which they were knocked 
do'wn. 

Sir Bolenbaugh, Sir Miller, and Sir Phipps were the next who met 
the wanderers in this mystic land. The Knights in turn introduced their 
brownies, Asafoetida Pills, Liquor Sodii Glycerophosphatis, and Syrupus 
Pruni Virginianae. While they were in drawn battle with this army of 
brownies, they were continually haunted by the specter of Pharmaceutical 
Arithmetic. 

Then they were presented to Sir Fletcher with some of his sprites, Phago- 
cjM:osis, Anaphylaxia, and Cardiac Cycle. By this time the ghost of Asphyxia 
being on their trail, they suddenly changed their course. 



When they were about to end their weary journey they came in contact 
with Sir Fackenhall who with much deUght made known his shadows and 
fairies, Thallophyta, Archigoniates, and Spermatophyta — but hold! Speech 
fails, and vision is blurred until a microscope has to be provided in order to 
detect the army of infinitesimal beings, Diatomacious Earth, and Cystoliths, 
following in Sir Fackenhall's wake. Materis Medica, the queen of all shadows 
and her followers, Pharmacodynamics, Therapeutics, and numerous others 
hold undisputed sway in his realm. 

This was the first year but regardless of all the pitfalls and stumbling 
blocks, including some of Sir Dwarf Rudd's Molecules and Atoms builded 
with his blocks, they still plod onward in search of Knowledge. 

When their journey is ended and Knowledge stands before them with a 
golden crown, some will take her grinding hand to travel further while others 
will leave her there, but all who meet her will live happily ever afterwards. 

HISTORIAN. 




99 




ll 



W^y^^^m^/^^^ ^^.^^^^'-^^^^ 



WHAT'S YOURS? 



"^ 






^ Jf reubian Hullabp 

Lullaby, my precious child. 
Psychoanalyse your mind; 
Wakeful though you are, and wild, 
Let us see if you can find 
Motives that you have repressed 
Which might interrupt your rest. 

Have you unfulfilled desires 
In your mystic little head? 
Dreams of toys with rubber tires 
That must be interpreted? 
Lullaby and tranquil keep — 
I impose the will-to-sleep. 
Lullaby, and close your eyes, 
For your nap must be enjoyed; 
I will psychoanalyse 
In the mode of Mr. Freud — 
In unconsciousness immersed. 
Maybe I shall slumber first! 




ITM 



l^iMn 



FRATES IN FACULTATE 



Anderson, Paul V. 
Baughman, Greer 
Blanton, C. A. 
Blanton, ll. Wallace 
Blackwell, K. S. 
Bright, J. Fulmer 
Brown, A. F., Jr. 
Brunk, O. C. 
Christian, W. T. 
Ennett, N. T. 
Fitts, J. B. 
Gray, A. L. 
Grinnan, St. Geo. T. 
Graham, W. T. 
Hopkins E. Guy 
Howie, Paul V. 



Johns, F. S. 
Mann, Herbert 
Mason, H. Norton 
Michaux, Stuart N. 
McGavock, E. P. 
McGuire, Stuart 
Nelson, J. Gamett 
Price, Lawrence T. 
Peple, W. Lownes 
Rucker, M. Pierce 
Shepherd, W. A. 
Tucker, Beverly T. 
White, Jos. A. 
Warinner, J. E. 
Williams, Ennion G. 
Willis, A. Murat 



103 




PI MU 

BETA- GAMMA CHAPTER 
M.C.V. 1919- 20 



104 



piWu 



Founded at University of Virginia 1892 

Beta Chapter established at University College of Medicine 1893 

Gamma Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia 1896 

Beta-Gamma Chapter formed at Medical College of Virginia 1913 

Colors: Crimson and Gold. Flowfer: Crimson Carnation 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Class 1920 



Edmonds, J. F. 



Ashworth, O. O. 
Creekmur, R. L. 
Perrman, T. B., Jr. 



Class 1921 



Wingfield, R. S. 

Kimbrough, A. M. 
Pifer, H. I. 



Harris, M. H. 
Sawyer, L. L. 



Avrack, J. W. 
Atkinson, B. J. 
Burns, J. E. 
Hening, L. P. 
Holderby, C. E. 



Class 1923 



Loving, J. B. 



Liggan, L. S. 
Mickle, R. E. 
Tucker, C. N. 
Wilson, A. A. 
Williams, J. P. 



105 



:s:-i^jiY 



^ 
m. 



IQ^O 



mMn 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Anderson. Paul V. 
Baughman, Greer 
Blackwell, K. S. 
Blanton, C. A. 
Blanton, H. W. 
Bright, J, Fulmar 
Brown, A. G., Jr. 
Brunk, O. C. 
Cole, Dean B. 
Christian, W. T. 
Craig, W. H. 
Ennett, N. Thomas 
Fitts, J. Blair 
Fowlkes, C. H. 
Gilman, Stewart 
Gorsline, I. T. 
Graham, W. T. 
Gray, A. L. 
Grinnan, St. Geo. T. 
Hobson, E. L. 
Hoge, M. D. 
Hopkins, E. Guy 
Howie, Paul W. 
Hughes, T. E. 
Johns, F. S. 
Lorraine, W. B. 
Mann, Herbert 



Mason, H. Norton 
McGavock, E. P. 
McGuire, Stuart 
Michaux, Stuart N. 
Moseley, E. J., Jr. 
Nelson, J. Garnett 
Newton, McGuire 
Paul, Ray 
Peple, W. Lownes 
Price, Lawrence T. 
Reade, F. M. 
Rex, J. P. 
Rucker, M. Pierce 
Rudasill, C. T. 
Shepherd, W. A. 
Talbot, E. B. 
Tucker, Beverly R. 
Tyler, Dorsey 
Upsher, Francis W. 
Vaughan, R. W. 
Warriner, J. E. 
Weisiger, W. R. 
White, Jos. A. 
Wiggs, L. B. 
Williams, Ennion G. 
Willis, A. Murat 
Willis, B. C. 



io6 



PJi €U 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA .... • • • • University of Vermont 

ALPHA-ALPHA University of Louisville 

ALPHA-BETA University of Tennessee 

ALPHA-THETA Western Reserve University 

ALPHA-MU •■ ■ ■ University of Indiana 

BETA University of Oregon 

BETA-BETA. . .University of Maryland 

GAMMA , Ohio State University 

GAMMA-GAMMA Bowdoin College 

DELTA Tufts College Medical School 

DELTA-DELTA College of Physicians and Surgeons 

EPSILON Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery 

ZETA ■ ■ University of Texas 

THETA-ETA Medical College of Virginia 

THETA-UPSILON Temple University 

IOTA University of Alabama 

IOTA-PI ■ University of Southern California 

KAPPA Georgetown University 

KAPPA-DELTA Johns Hopkins University 

MU -■..••....•..... Indiana University Medical School 

XI Texas Christian University 

OMICRON Tulane University 

PI Vanderbilt University 

PI-DELTA-PHI University of California 

RHO University of Chicago 

SIGMA Atlanta Medical College 

SIGM A-THETA University of North Carolina 

SIGMA-EPSILON. . . Leland Stanford University 

UPSILON-PI • • University of Pennsylvania 

PHI George Washington University 

PHI-BETA University of Illinois 

PHl-RHO St. Louis University 

PHI-SIGMA Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery 

CHI -. Jefferson Medical College 

CHI-2ETA Medical Chiurgical School 

PSI University of Michigan 



107 




^^r '• 



1 08 



mi cji 



Founded at University of Vermont, 1887 

Theta Chapter installed 1900. Eta Chapter installed 1903. 

Theta-Eta Chapter combined 1913 

Colors: Green and White Flower: Lily of Valley 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Kline, H. W. 



Class 1920 
Moorman, C. 



Stump, C. E. 



Davis, J. M. 
Davis, T. D. 
Langston, H. J. 



Class 1921 

Maloney, G. R. 
Stratford, A. L. 



McCutchen, W. B. 
Wall, H. A. 



Caravati, C. M. 
Crawford, W. J. 



Class 1922 

Dickerson, W. E. 
Whitaker, P. F. 



Woods, J. B., Jr. 



Beasley, W. S., Jr. 
Combs, F. 
Cozart, S. R. 



Class 1923 

Hornaday, J. M. 
Luttrell, H. B. 
Martin, J. L. 



Owens, W. I. 
Westerman, D. E. 



log 



:s:-^u^^^ 



TUP 

M 



/ A \V\ 



\V \\\ 



IQ^O 



f J)i Cf)i 



Blair, J. R. 
Henson, J. W. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Jones, B. B. Tabb, J. L. 

Ross, C. F. 



Blair, J. R. 
Cloyd, J. A. 
Cowardin, W. J. 
Fulton, J. F. 
Fitzgerald, R. S. 
Gray, B. H. 
Gayle, R. F. 
Hutchinson, J. M. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Henson, J. W. 
Jones, W. R. 
Jones, B. B. 
Lord, F. K. 
Masters, H. R. 
Mason, W. R., Jr. 
Mercer, W. J. 
Rosebro, B. M. 



Ross, C. F. 
Tabb, J. L. 
Nixon, S. R. 
Stuart, R. R. 
Taylor, H. McG. 
Wiat, R. G. 
Willis, R. G. 
Winn, J. F. 



mi Peta m 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ZETA Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md. 

ETA Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHI PSI Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

CHI Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. 

ALPHA ETA University of Virginia, University, Va. 

ALPHA XI Harvard University, BrookUne, Mass. 

ALPHA OMICRON Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

ALPHA SIGMA. . . ., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ALPHA NU University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 

ALPHA RHO Oakland Medical College, Oakland, Cal. 

ALPHA TAU University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

RHO Medical Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 

ALPHA BETA Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

ALPHA KAPPA University of Texas, Galveston, Tex. 

ALPHA LAMBDA University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

BETA University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

DELTA Rush Medical College (University of Chicago), Chicago, 111. 

THETA Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, 111. 

IOTA College of P. and S., University of Illinois, Chicago, 111. 

KAPPA Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery, Detroit, Mich. 

OMICRON Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Ind. 

ALPHA EPSILON Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 

ALPHA ZETA Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, Ind. 

ALPHA MU University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky. 

ALPHA PI University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

LAMBDA St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 

MU Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

XI University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

PI University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

TAU University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

ALPHA ALPHA John A. Creighton University, Omaha, Neb. 

ALPHA IOTA University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. 




PHI BETA PI 



mi S^eta m 



Organized at the University of Pittsburgh, 1891 
Phi Psi Chapter established at the Medical College of Virginia, 1901 
Colors: Flowers: 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Lyerly, J. G. 



Class 1920 
Shawver, J. W. 



Kyle, R. S. 



Class 1922 
Ozlin, W. J. 



Winn, T. M. 



Clements, J. C. 



Class 1923 
Payne, W. R. 
Edwards, R. H. 



Harris, R. N. 



"3 



Mi Peta M 



Booe, J. G. 
Brinkley, A. S. 
Ezekiel, A. G. 
Houser, A. A. 
Satewood, E. T. 
Levy, E. C. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Mauck, H. P. 
Merrick, T. D. 
Nichols, A. R. 
Oppenheimer, St. Julian 
Oppenheimer, W. T. 
Sease, C. I. 



Stoneburner, L. T. 
Strickland, W. M. 
Turner, N. H. 
Urbach, Howard 
Wright, R. H. 



114 



(9mt^a Mpgilon Mi 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA University of Buffalo, N. Y. 

BETA Ohio-Miami Medical College of the University of Cincinnati 

GAMMA ,, Albany Medical CoUege, Albany, N. Y. 

DELTA University of Colorado, Denver, Col. 

EPSILON University and BeUevue Medical College, New York, N. Y. 

ETA University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 

IOTA Leland Stanford Jr. University, San Francisco, Cal. 

NU (TAU XI) Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

PI University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

RHO Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHI Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 

CHI Fordham University, New York, N. Y. 

PSI (DELTA MU) University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



"5 






^W F<).C«5AL0UC 



JOSEPH COATES 



P.G.FOX F.C.HANCV 








&W, PARSON 




c. w, puTNty ^m^^w 

■^ s JCROBERTSON 






O.P ROBERTSON 



(I. K. SHUMATE 







ii6 



0mt^a Wip^ilon ^Ji 



Founded at the University of Buffalo, November 15, 1894 

Nu Chapter established at the Medical College of Virginia, March 1, 1903 

Colors: Crimson and Gold Flower: Red Carnation 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Bell, H. O. 



Class 1920 
Leech, F. M. 



Ownbey, A. D. 



Casulduc, F. J. 
Putney, C. W. 



Class 1921 
Shumate, J. K. 
Claud, H. L. 



Wood, R. H. 



Coates, Joseph 
Hileman, S. P. 



Class 1922 
Parsons, G. W. 
Fox, P. G. 



Robertson, J. C. 



Babb, E. M. 
Batte, W. H. 
Davis, J. G. 



Class 1923 
Handy, F. E. 
Horton, H. L. 
Menzies, H. H. 



Robertson, J. P. 
Robertson, J. N. 



117 



(Iomega Mpsiilon $f)i 



Bosher, Lewis C. 
Bryan, Robert C. 
Folkes, C. A. 
Herring, A. L. 
Henderson, T. B. 
Hodges, J. Allison 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Hodges, Fred. M. 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Lewis, C. Howard 
Martin, G. B. 
Miller, Clifton M. 
Moon, S. B. 



Rawls, B. W. 
Robins, Charles R. 
LaRoque, G. Paul 
Trice, E. T. 
Terrell, E. H. 



Anderson, M. L. 
Baker, Sidney J. 
Beadles, Frank J. 
Boisseaux, J. G. 
Carrington, Charles A. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Elder, J. N. 
Elder, D. L. 
Edmunds, M. C. 
Jones, T. D. 
Labenberg, C. A. 



Mitchell, R. E. 
Summers, B. E. 
Staton, L. B. 
Weitzel, John S. 
Wilkinson, R. J. 



ii8 




3^U 3^1)0 ^igma 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA Northwestern University, Chicago, 111. 

BETA University of Illinois, Chicago, 111. 

GAMMA Rush Medical College, Chicago, 111. 

DELTA College of Physicians and Surgeons, Los Angeles, Cal. 

EPSILON Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery, Detroit, Mich. 

ZETA University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

ETA , John A. Creighton Medical College, Omaha, Neb. 

THETA TAU University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

IOTA University of Nebraska, Omaha and Lincoln, Neb. 

KAPPA Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 

LAMND A PHI University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MU State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

NU Harvard University, Boston, Mass. 

OMICRON Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 

PI ALPHA Indiana University, Indianapolis, Ind. 

PI BETA Bloomington, Ind. 

RHO Jefferson College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SIGMA University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 

UPSILON Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

CHI University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PSI University of Colorado, Boulder and Denver, Col. 

ALPHA OMEGA DELTA . .University of Buffalo, Buffalo, N. Y. 

OMEGA Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 

ALPHA BETA Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 

New York City 
ALPHA GAMMA McGill University, Montreal, Que., Can. 

DELTA OMICRON ALPHA Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

PHI RHO SIGMA ALUMNI CHAPTER Harvard University, Boston, Mass. 

NORTHERN OHIO ALUMNI CHAPTER Western Reserve University, 

Cleveland, Ohio 
119 



Us? #5r 



^^^ '#2^ 






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•l^r 



FUP/, 



1^ t^- 



$t)i 3^60 ^igma 



Founded at Northwestern Medical School, Chicago, 111., October 31, 1890 
Upsilon Chapter estabUshed April 28, 1905 
Colors: Old Gold and Crimson 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Huston, H. R. 
Green, W. T. 



Class 1920 

Sheridan, T. C. 
West, W. C. 



Mitchell, H. L. 



Doss, R. R. 
Gillespie, R. F. 



Class 1921 

Irvin, C. M. 
Richardson, J. K. 



Snead, L. O. 



Cline, R. F. 
Murray, D. O. 



Class 1922 
Nofsinger, C. D. 
Seward, B. P. 



Taylor, J. E. 



Graham, J. T. 
Gwynn, H. L. 



Class 1923 

Jones, R. R. 
Neal, P. H. 



Hawkins, R. P. 
Stuart, D. B. 



:x:-KJ3:^i^ 



- ©LV 




^f)i ^1)0 ^igma 



Budd, S. W. 
Bullock, H. A. 
Dalton, J. B. 
Eckles, Beverley 
Eggleston, E. C. 
Fravel, R. C. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Falkner, W. W. 
Geisinger, J. F. 
Gill, W. W. 
Higgins, W. H. 
Hillsman, Blanton L. 
Hodnett, W. S. 



Murrell, T. W. 
Pitt, Cullen S. 
Porter, W. B. 
Smith, James H. 
Turman, A. E. 
Turman, J. W. 



MacLean, H. 
Ray, F. L. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Lewis, P. S. 
Whitehead, Robert W. 



Belcher, A. C. 
Carroll, Patrick 



€U ^eta Ciji 



CHAPTERS 
Alpha Province 

ALPHA University of Georgia 

THETA Vanderbilt University 

LAMBDA 1 University of Tennessee 

MU Tulane University 

NU University of Arkansas 

OMICRON Washington University 

XI St. Louis University 

ALPHA-ALPHA Emory University 

Beta Province 

BETA College of Physicians and Surgeons 

DELTA University of Maryland 

UPSILON Fordham University 

RHO College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore 

PSI Medical College of Virginia 



123 




CHI ZETA CHI 



124 



€U ^eta Ci)i 



Founded at University of Georgia, 1903 
Psi Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia, 1910 
Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: White Carnation 



Mitchell, Z. P. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Class 1920 



Smith, J. E. 



Aycock, F. M. 
Carr, A. B. 



Class 1921 

Cochran, C. C. 
Robertson, P. A. 



Whitmore, W. H. 



Class 1922 



Harrington, R. H. 



Haynes, W. R. 



Mease, J. A. 
Prichard, C. C. 



Class 1923 
Triccise. J. P. 



Schiefelbein, H. F. 
Boatright, Doris C. 



125 



Cf)i leta Cfji 



Lipscomb, P. D. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Sherrick, W. R. Sycle, M. C. 



Foltz, J. D. 
Lipscomb, P. D. 
McCarthy, D. S. 
Muncy, D. S. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Hannabass, J. W. 
Nance, C. L. 
Oats, W. C. 
Sherrick, W. R. 



Shelton, T. S. 
Sycle, M. C. 
Thompson, W. P. 
Timberlake, R. E. 



126 



Ki mi mi 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA. .University of Michigan, Dental Dept., Ann Arbor, Michigan 

BETA New York College of Dentistry, New York, N. Y. 

GAMMA Philadelphia Dental College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

DELTA. Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Baltimore. Md. 

EPSILON University of Iowa, Dental Dept., Iowa City, Iowa 

ZETA Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ETA , . . . University of Maryland, Dental Dept., Baltimore, Md. 

THETA Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis, Ind. 

IOTA. University of California, Dental Dept., Columbus, Ohio 

KAPPA Ohio State University, Dental Dept., San Francisco, Calif. 

LAMBDA . . . .Chicago College of Dental Surgery, Chicago, 111. 

MU University of Buffalo, Dental Dept.. Buffalo, N. Y. 

NU Harvard University, Dental Dept., Boston, Mass. 

XI Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

OMICRON .Royal College of Dental Surgeons, Toronto, Ont. 

PI ..... .University of Pennsylvania, Dental Dept., Philadelphia, Pa. 

RHO Northwestern University, Dental School, Chicago, 111. 

SIGMA .University of Illinois, Dental Dept., Chicago, 111. 

TAU- • .Washington University, Dental Dept., St. Louis, Mo. 

UPSILON Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Cincinnati, Ohio 

PHI University of Minnesota, Dental Dept., Minneapolis, Minn. 

CHI Western Dental College, Kansas City, Mo. 

PSI Lincoln Dental College, Lincoln, Neb. 

OMEGA Vanderbilt University, Dental Dept., Nashville, Tenn. 

ALPHA-ALPHA. . Detroit Medical College, Dental Dept., Detroit, Mich. 

ALPHA-BETA. Baltimore Medical College, Dental Dept., Baltimore, Md. 

ALPHA-DELTA New Orleans College of Dentistry, New Orleans, La. 

ALPHA-EPSILON .. .North Pacific Dental College, Portland, Ore. 

ALPHA-ZETA Southern Dental College. Atlanta, Ga. 

ALPHA-ETA. Atlanta Dental College, Atlanta, Ga. 

ALPHA-THETA . . University of Southern California, Dental Dept., Los Angeles, Calif. 

ALPHA-IOTA Central University of Kentucky, Dental Dept., Louisville College 

of Dentistry, Louisville, Ky. 
ALPHA-KAPPA. Creighton University, College of Dentistry, Omaha, Neb. 



127 



irsiffi^ss^i^ 



mL^a 




128 



m m w 



Founded at the University of Michigan, April I, 1889. 

Xi Chapter established at the University College of Medicine, March 26, 1903. 

Colors: Lavender and Cream Flower; Red Rose 



Grove, C. S. 
Somerdahl, H. F. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class 1921 



Leonard, F. L. 
Hitt, A. M. 



Lacy, M. B. 



Caravati, H. L. 
Clark, W. E. 
Delp, C. M. 
Goolsby, F. G. 
Harlow, T. L. 



Class 1922 



Class 1923 

Kirby, K. H. 
Madry, D. A. 
Martin, R. L. 
Reese, C. B. 
Shotwell, H. C. 



White, W. W. 



Snead, G. H. 
Smoot, F. P. 
Tipton, T. A. 
White, P. M. 
Zickrick, K. H. 



i2g 



m m mt 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Scales, T. H. Simpson, R. L. 

Walton, L. J. 



Williams, J. B. 



Alexander. J. A. 
Blackwell, B. F. 
Bloxton, J. B. 
Broaddus, W. E. 
Beaks, H. C. 
Carneal, M. G. 
Cowardin, W. J. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Hughes, J. M. 
Jeffries, R. H. 
Kelly, F. R. 
King, R. M. 
McCray, B. V. 
Mears, H. L. 
Mears, J. L. 



Pusey, R. I. 
Russell, H. G. 
Walden, R. C. 
Wood, T. W. 
Stigall, J. J. 
Underbill, T. A. 



Honorary 
Miss F. L. Ogilvie 



130 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA ■ . . Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

BETA - New York College of Dental Surgery 

DELTA Tuft's Dental College, Boston, Mass 

EPSILON . Western Reserve University 

XETA University of Pennsylvania 

ETA Philadelphia Dental College 

THETA University of Buffalo 

IOTA Northwestern University 

KAPPA Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

LAMBDA University of Minnesota 

MU 1 University of Denver 

NU University of Pittsburg 

XI Marquette Universiay 

MU DELTA Harvard University Dental School 

OMICRON Louisville College of Dental Surgery 

BETA SIGMA College of Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco 

RHO Ohio College of Dental Surgery 

GAMMA TAU Atlanta Southern Dental College 

UPSILON University of California 

PHI University of Maryland 

CHI North Pacific Dental College 

PSI Ohio State Universiay 

OMEGA Indiana Dental College 

BETA ALPHA University of Illinois 

BETA GAMMA George Washington University 

BETA DELTA University of California 

BETA EPSILON New Orleans College of Dentistry 

BETA ZETA St. Louis Dental College 

BETA THETA Georgetown University 

GAMMA KAPPA University of Michigan 

GAMMA LAMBDA College of Dental and Oral Surgery of New York 

GAMMA MU University of Iowa 

GAMMA NU Vanderbilt University 

GAMMA OMICRON Medical College of Virginia 

GAMMA PI Washington University 

DELTA RHO Kansas City Dental College 

DELTA TAU Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons 

DELTA UPSILON Texas Dental College 

DELTA PHI Western Dental College 

DELTA CHI Royal College of Dental Surgeons, Toronto 

131 




C^^m 








flK' 



ll!^ 





^ O \i^ -I's! 








f^-r 





132 



P^i (0mega 



Founded at Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 1892. 

Gamma Omicron Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia, 1908. 

Gamma XI Chapter established at University College of Medicine, 1907. 

Gamma Omicron and Gamma Xi Chapters united in 1913. 

Colors: Blue and White. Flowers: Violets and Roses 



Lewis, W. P. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Class 1920 
Palmer, W. G. 



Shepherd, J. L., Jr. 



Barnett, O. G. 
Bristoe, O. A. 
Conner, B. H. 



Class 1921 

Cline, W. R. 
Hankins, W. H. 
Rains, W. B. 



Pumphrey, P. W. 
Tyree, J. C. 



Creasy, W .F. 



Class 1922 

Watts, D. L. 
Haller, J. A. 



Warren, B. T. 



Belcher, J. O. 
Boaz, T. A. 
Brown, T. H. 
Burks, B. S. 
Clark, Robert 



Class 1923 

Fitzgerald, H. V. 
Klor, A. E. G., Jr. 
Knight, W. I. 
Worthington, F. H. 



Maynard, T. H. 
Packard, H. S. 
Sherrod, W. B. 
Squire, T. A. 



133 



^sfi d^mega 



Bear, Harry 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Hoggan, J. A. C. 



Bear, Harry 
Blankenbaker, E. L. 
Bowman, L. M. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Bagley, W. A. 
Bowles, C. F. 
Brent. R. S. 
Rice, G. W. 



Hoggan, J. A. C. 
Leach, A. G. 
Lewis, J. M. 



134 



Heta Belta Ciji 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 

BETA Baylor University, Texas 

GAMMA Medical College of Virginia 

DELTA Southern Methodist University, Texas 



'35 




136 



^eta ISelta CJji 



Founded at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1902. 

Gamma Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia, 1911. 

Colors: Gold and Black. Flower: Daffodil. 



Farley, L. J. 
Grinstead, C. P. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class 1920 

Painter, L. R. 
Smith, J .A. 



Thomas, W. J. 
Walker, R. J. 



Bowman, D. C. 
Brown, H. W. 
Cochran, R. H. 
Channing, S. H. 
Farlowe, G. D. 



Class 1921 

Farrar, G. M. 
Hopkins, J. C. 
Jackson, R. C. 
Norman, J. P. 
Randolph, B. L. 



Spiggle, C. S. 
Shumate, W. B. 
Williamson, J. W. 
Willis, T. B. 



137 



x-iii3;"i^ 







Heta ©elta Cfji 



Beech, C. H. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Fackenthall, Philip F. 



Chiles, M. H. 
Cole, W. B. 
Howard, T. L. 
Holmes, W. A. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Hoover, W. H. 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Lowery, R. M. 
Shield, H. M. 



VanPelt, W. T. 
White, B. G. 
Wilson, E. C. 



Beadles, Frank H. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Ennett, N. Thomas 
Fackenthall, Philip F. 



Hauser, Aubrey D. 



i38 




$i l^fteta ^igma 



CHAPTERS 

ALPHA Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 

BETA \ Medical College of Virginia 

GAMMA Brooklyn College of Pharmacy 

DELTA University of Kansas 



139 




140 



Founded at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1902 

Beta Chapter established at Medical College of Virginia, 1905 

Colors: Red and White Flower: Red Rose 



Britton, F. J. 
Burnett, B. E. 
Darden, P. E. 
Ham, T. J., Jr. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class 1920 

Johnston, G. W. 
Litz, J. E. 
Lyle, G. W. 
Parker, R. M. 



Walker, D. V. 
Willcoxon, J. W. 
Witten, E. B. 



Class 1921 



Andes, G. E. 
Berry, H. W. 
Bond, W. R. 
Cheatham, A. B. 
Cousins, J. A. 
Cress, H. G. 
Derr, O. D. 
Francis, P. G. 
Gary, J. H. 



Hargis, W. J. 
Hodgess, C. O. 
Hawthorne, C. F. 
Jennings, G. N. 
Kelly, M. P. 
Lacy, G. E. 
Lowman, J. L. 
Mann, E. L. 
Maupin, J. W. 



Parker, R. B. 
Rose, E. K. 
Saunders, L. S. 
Smith, W. A. 
Thomas, J. G. 
Vaughn, A. L. 
Smith, R. E. 
Wood, F. E. 



J41 



Bolenbaugh, Albert 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Miller, R. W. 



Rudd, W. F. 



Brandis, E. L. 
Burns, J. E. 
Crumpton, E. D. 
Johann, A. E. 
Ligon, T. A. 
Miller, T. A. 
Hendley, J. F. 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Martin, R. L. 
Phillips, W. R. 
Woolfolk, H. 
Wade, E. W. 
Whitehead, H. G. 
Morrissette, R. T. 
Walker, C. F. 



Hoffman, W. F. 
Williams, J. B. 
Reams, P. L. 
Brugh, E. A. 
Kuester, J. T. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Brandis, E. L. Barkedale, G. E. Miller, T. A. 

Bolenbaugh, Albert Miller, R. W. Rudd, W. F. 



142 




mmu' 




^ mmm^ 







i', . 



\j\ 




143 




144 



D. O. MURRY Captain 

B. L. WARREN Manager 

C. M. CARAVATI Assistant Manager 

TEAM 

Forwards 
D. O. Murry J. M. Hornaday B. C. Moreland 

Center 
Phillip Neal 

Guards 
W. E. Dickerson F. H. Handy 



145 




146 



iBasfket Pall ^quatr 





THE SQUAD 


Murry 


Neal 


Hornaday 


Woods 


Moreland 


Trecisse 


Martin 


Dickerson 



Handy 

Tyler 

Caravati 



SCHEDULE 

Teams Opponents 

Union Theological Seminary 24 

Randolph Macon 34 

William and Mary 13 

Hampton Legion 21 

William and Mary 16 

Richmond College 20 

Randolph Macon 30 

Hampden-Sidney 19 

Richmond College 40 

Church Hill A. C 44 

Hampden-Sidney 16 

277 

Average score a game 25 



1. C. V. 


Place 


37 


Y. W. C. A. 


30 


Ashland 


35 


WilUiamsburg 


36 


Y. W. C. A. 


53 


Y. W. C. A. 


45 


Y. W. C. A. 


34 


Y. W. C. A. 


37 


Farmville 


52 


Y. W. C. A. 


34 


Y. W. C. A. 


48 


Y. W. C. A. 


441 




40 





147 



Pa£fket pall ^tmmt 




VERY person affiliated with the Medical College of Virginia, was 
indeed proud of their Basket Ball team, which was really the first 
successful team turned out in recent years. Handicapped, by 
lack of time and without the service of a coach, but aided mate- 
rially by the experience of Murry and Dickerson, the team devel- 
oped into one, which would give credit to any institution. 

The spirit with which the Student Body backed the team was worthy of 
much praise, and no doubt contributed no little to their admirable success. 
At every game most of the student was present, lending their moral support 
to their team. 

The record for the season was nine games won and two lost. We were 
beaten by Randolph Macon in Ashland, but defeated them in Richmond, 
before an audience that filled the capacity of the local Y. W. C. A. Our 
second defeat was at the hands of the Church Hill A. C. who by virtue of 
their victory claimed the championship of Richmond. Our total score was 
441 points to our opponents 277, making an average of 40 points for each 
game that the Medicos played, as compared to an average of 25 points made 
by our opposing teams. 

To select the most valuable man on the team would be impossible; while 
Murry was the greatest point scorer, Dickerson at guard, probably excelled 
in handling the ball and intercepting opponents' passes. These men played 
in every game, and were conspicuous for their "never-say-die" spirit, which 
was an incentive for the other less experienced, though willing and faithful 
freshmen. 

Neal, who played center, though handicapped by lack of height, was an 
accurate goal shooter, being next to Murry in number of points scored. He 
followed the ball, and watched the opposing center with consistency. 

Handy, stationary guard, was steady and fast and held his opposing for- 
wards with skill and was an important cog in the passing machine, which 
was efficiently developed. 

148 



Hornaday, without a doubt, handled the ball with more ease than any man 
in this section. He was a consistent floor man and his loss to the team in 
four games, on account of sickness, was greatly felt. 

Moreland was an accurate shot and unselfish passer. 

Tyler at guard, and Martin at forward were both of much value to the 
team, and could hardly be classed as substitutes, as they played in nearly 
every game. 

Trecisse, Woods, and H. Caravati, deserve credit for their faithfulness in 
coming to practices, and their co-operation in everything that aided the team. 

The assistance rendered by Dr. S. W. Budd and J. E. Taylor, was 
invaluable. 

Much praise a;id gratitude is due to the authorities of the Y. W. C. A. 
and the McGill Catholic Union, for the use of their respective gymnasiums, 
the former for all of our home games and the latter for practice. Their kind- 
ness and willingness to help cannot be forgotten, and without their much 
needed assistance, our Basket Ball season could not have been a success. 

To sum up, we cannot but feel that our Basket-Bali team was a huge 
success. Besides the formidable record, which it asquired, it enthused into 
the entire student body that loyal College spirit, the lack of which has been 
a drawback in Medical College activities for many years. 




149 



kN:>i 



lW^ 







^\)t 0ptxation 



Everything is ready for the surgeon to commence, 

While the patient fast is faiHng where the ether fumes are dense — 

The nurses capped and ready, with instruments at hand, 

And everything's as silent as a night in NO MAN'S LAND. 

The surgeon comes directly with fever in his eye 
And masked and gloved and ready to do his WORST or die. 
He grabs a piece of cutlery, and pauses with decision — 
Looking like some butcher in the Spanish Inquisition. 

He makes a dangerous pass or two then plunges in the steel — 
While an interne climbs a ladder to bring down the patient's heels. 
He saws and hacks and butchers with a blooming reckless will, 
And wonders just how much blood the patient has to spill. 

Nothing can stop his bloody course, nor can his ardor dim — 
While the nurses count the pieces to see that NOTHING is left in. 
He works and sweats and "cusses" while his ambitions soar, 
And he pauses only for a breath when he's cut through to the floor. 

After everything has vanished and there's nothing else to hack. 
He softens to compassion and puts a few things back. 
His work is done! — and reluctantly he leaves his bloody station 
While we wonder how a man can live upon just a reputation. 

For there's really nothing left within — of that we have no doubt. 

And we don't see how the patient lives with ALL HIS INSIDES OUT! 

But millions do it daily so WE have no room to "cuss" — 

But gee ! we'd hate to have that BIRD a-making holes in us. 

HENING. 



150 




^ijocfeing 



The naked hills lie wanton to the breeze, 
Shivering are the limbs of shameless trees, 
The fields are bare, the grove unfrocked. 
What wonder is it the corn is shocked? 



151 



OTijen JBoctorsi ©igagtee 



He looked at my tongue, and he shook his head- 

This was Doctor Smart — 
He thumped on my chest, and then he said: 

"Ah, there it is! Your Heart! 
You musnt' run, you mustn't hurry! 
You mustn't work, you mustn't worry! 
Just sit down and take it cool; 

You may live for years, I cannot say. 
But, in the meantime, make it a rule 

To take this medicine twice a day." 

He looked at my tongue, and he shook his head- 

This was Doctor Wise — 
"Your liver is a total wreck," he said. 

"You must take more exercise! 
You mustn't eat sweets. 
You mustn't eat meats. 
You must walk and leap, you must also run, 

You mustn't sit down in the dull old way, 
Get out with the boys and have some fun — 

And take three doses of this a day!" 

He looked at my tongue, and he shook his head- 

This was Doctor Bright — 
"I'm afraid your lungs are gone," he said, 

"And your kidney isn't right. 
A change of scene is what you need. 
Your case is desperate, indeed. 
And bread is a thing you mustn't eat — 

For much starch — but, by the way. 
You must henceforth live on only meats — 

And take six doses of this a day!" 

Perhaps they were right, and perhaps they knew, 

It isn't for me to say; 
Mayhap I erred when I madly threw 

Their bitter stuff away; 
But I'm living yet and am on my feet. 
And grass isn't all I dare to eat. 
And I walk and I run and I worry, too. 

But to save my life I cannot see 
What some of the able doctors would do 

If there were no fools like you and me. 



152 




153 




154 



S. M^ C, ^. 



g glB^ gj|HE Y. M. C. A. of the Medical College of Virginia, while not the 
mRKV^ oldest, is the largest and most comprehensive of the student 
M^X^ji organizations. The College Y. M. C. A. was organized the month 
2^s^^ of April, 1916, with fifty charter members. Two years later the 
Association, having made certain plans by which it could better 
meet the needs of the students, the Medical College, and further its work, was 
incorporated under the state laws of Virginia, with a Board of Directors of 
twelve members. From the time the Association began its work until now, 
the work has prospered and an increased interest has been taken in its 
service program. 

Today the College Y. M. C. A., through its members and friends, owns 
a beautiful cottage at Blue Ridge, N. C, at which place is located the home 
of the Southern College Blue Ridge Association. 

It is also proud of its new achievement — College Hall, the present Student 
Association Building. The Board of Directors of the College Y. M. C. A. 
purchased and equipped this property at a cost of $65,000. College Hall, 
the student home and center, is the first Y. M. C. A. building to be provided 
for its students in a Medical College. With these great opportunities that 
have come, the College Y. M. C. A. feels its responsibility perhaps more 
keenly than ever before. 

The Association activities in its several departments of active service for 
and by the students, is invested in a Student Y. M. C. A. Council, elected by 
the Association membership, and directed by a full time Association Secretary. 
To each and every one who has contributed to its success, and has had 
a share in furthering its principles, laid down by our Great Physician, we can 
only say — to Him and you be the glory. 



155 




156 



^tutrent f. Jl. C. ^, Cabinet anb Council 

R. HUGH WOOD President 

J. C. TYREE Vice-President 

D. V. WALKER Recording Secretary 

W. B. RAINS Treasurer 



MEMBERS OF COMMITTEES 



Membership 

D. C. Murry, Chairman 

E. M. Babb 
H. I. Pifer 
J. G. Davis 
W. M. Mebane 

Social Service 
W. E. Dickerson, Chairman 
J. B. Loving 
E. R. Mickle 
Percy Fox 
T. D. Davis 

Missionary 
J. B. Woods, Jr., Chairman 
H. J. Langston 
J. W. Lewis 
Saburo Emy 
I. S. Barksdale 

Finance 
W. B. Rains, Chairman 
W. H. Whitmore 
J. P. Williams 
C. R. Huston 
H. C. Bell 

Bible Study and Church Affiliation 
G. R. Maloney, Chairman 
Carleton Moorman 

B. S. Burks 

C. E. Perkins 
H. H. Menzies 



Meetings 

Malcolm Harris, Chairman 
H. B. Luttrell 
A. A. Wilson 
Thos. W. Winn 
Lee Liggan 

Music 
R. N. Lanier, Chairman 
R. A. Gay 

E. S. White 
L. J. Farley 
H. S. East 

Social and Entertainment 
J. K. Shumate, Chairman 
W. B. McCutchen 

F. M. Aycock 
R. J. Walker 
F. P. Smoot 

Athletics 

C. M. Caravati, Chairman 

Henry Caravati 

P. H. Neal 

P. C. Moreland 

F. E. Handy 

Employment 

C. W. Putney, Chairman 
H. L. Claud 
C. B. Jennings 
R. M. Parker 
L. S. Mabry 



157 







ilebical College of Virginia g. il, C. ^. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

DR. ENNION G. WILLIAMS President 

DR. R. R. BYRNES Vice-President 

DR. WILLIAM H. HIGGINS Secretary 

MR. ROBERT F. McCRACKAN Treasurer 

Dr. J. A. Hodges 
Dr. W. T. Graham 
Dr. K. S. Blackwell 

Mr. T. A. Miller 
Dr. Paul V. Anderson 

Dr. R. L. Simpson 
Dr. Greer Baughman 



FINANCE AND HOUSE COMMITTEE 

DR. E. C. L. MILLER, Chairman 

DR. R. R. BYRNES, Treasurer 

MR. PHIL B. TRIGG, Secretary 

Dr. Ennion G. Williams 

Dr. Greer Baughman 

Dr. J. A. C. Hoggan 

Mr. J. R. McCauley 

Mr. R. H. Wood 

Mr. R. J. Walker 

Mr. W. B. Rains 



IS8 



1^ "f 



:s:-T^sr^ 





:l&20 




Mary had a swarm of bees, 
And they to save their lives 

Must go wherever Mary went, 
'Cause Mary had the hives. 



159 



^^^: 






0ht to tfje ^nfelo£^toma ©oubenale 

Lo, the poor Hookworm! whose untutored mind 

Intestinal canals essays to find; 

Of whose evolvings, savants show the mode, 

From egg to larva, then to nematode. 

Its soul proud science never sought to stray 

Far as the solar walk, in slime it lay; 

Trusting that fate would soon the favor grant 

To reach the genus homo's sewage plant. 

Once through a pore or down the fauces passed. 

Its homing instinct finds the goal at last; 

And staking out a claim inside the lumen 

Of ileum or convolate jejunum. 

It yields to cupid's dart, seeks out its mate. 

And joyfully proceeds to propogate. 

There, safely clinging to sustaining villi. 

It feasts and fattens, hoping willy-nilly. 

That no dread oil of chenopodium. 

Whose presence fills its breast with odium. 

Will be ingested by its long-suffering host 

And straightway force him to give up the ghost; 

And later, fixed to microscopic slide, 

Be rubbered at in posture as he died. 



1 60 



/ 1 

t — . 

1 


( ' 

! ! 



-3 



^ 



□ 




i6i 







162 



JPtarmaceutical ^sigociation 

OFFICERS 
J. E. LITZ • • ■ President 

D. V. WALKER Vice-President 

J. L. LO WM AN • • ■ Second Vice-President 

E. K. ROSE • ■ ■ Secretary and Treasurer 



Weinstein, S. 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
Mebane, W. M. Lowman, J. L. 



Hopkins, J. C. 





ROLL 






Seniors 




Britton, F. J. 


Lyle, G. W. 


Varlet, Miss S. 


Burnett, B. E. 


Mebane, W. M. 


Vincent, Miss Ruth 


Darden, P. E. 


Painter, L. R. 


Walker, D. V. 


Farley, L. J. 


Parker, R. M. 


Walker, R. J. 


Grinstead, C. P. 


Patterson, Miss M. G. 


Weinstein, S. 


Ham, T. J., Jr. 


Saunders, Miss Hilda 


White, E. S. 


Hurt, R. H. 


Smith, J. A. 


Willcoxon, J. W. 


Johnson, G. W. 


Thomas, W. J. 


Witten, E. B. 


Litz, J. E. 


Varlet, Miss F. M. 
Juniors 




Adams, J. S. 


Hargis, W. J. 


Parker, R. B. 


Andes, G. E. 


Hawthorne. C. F. 


Perry, R. 


Beahm, W. P. 


Hodges, C. O. 


Porter, L. T. 


Bennett, Miss H. 


Hood, H. S. 


Ramsey, A. D. 


Biscoe, J. W. 


Hopkins, J. C. 


Randolph, B. L. 


Bond, W. R. 


House, W. O. 


Rector, C. P. 


Berry, H. W. 


Jackson, R. C. 


Remine, J. C. 


Brown, H. W. 


Jefferies, C. L. 


Rose, E. K. 


Bowman, D. C. 


Jennings, G. N. 


Roberts, E. P. 


Channing, S. H. 


Johnson, B. W. 


Salazar, A. L. 


Cheatham. A. B. 


Kelly, M. P. 


Saunders, L. S. 


Cochran, R. H. 


Keys, J. 


Savage, Miss M. E. 


Cousins, J. A. 


Lacy, G. E. 


Seawell, H. C. 


Cress, H. G. 


Leech, W. M. 


Shumate, W. B. 


Dailey, J. F. 


Lichtenstein, J. 


Smith, R. E. 


Darlington, J. 


Lloyds, J. T. 


Smith, W. A. 


Derr, O. D. 


Lowman, J. L. 


Spiggle, C. H. 


Dickenson, F. B. 


Mann, E. L. 


Thomas, J. G. 


Dodson, W. H. 


Marshall, T. F. 


Vaughan, A. L. 


East, H. S. 


Martin, A. N. 


Williams, D. S. 


Farlow, G. D. 


Maupin, J. W. 


Willis, T. 


Farrar, G. M. 


Monroe, J. T. 


Wood, F. E. 


Francis, P. J. 


Moreland, P. C. 


Williamson, J. W. 


Gary, J. H. 


Newman, R. L. 


Norman, J. P. 


Griffin, O. 


Noveck, M. 


Williams, R. G. 



163 




^f)armaceutital ^sisiociation 

'T was the year of 1908-1909 that a small group of students of the 
Department of Pharmacy of the University College of Medicine 
met together and formed a fraternity organization which is now 
known as the Pharmaceutical Association of the Medical College 
of Virginia. The purpose of this organization is to increase in- 
terest in the College work and the field of Pharmacy. Also to create a bond 
of closer fellowship among the members of the student body. The meetings 
of the Association are twice a month, on the first and third Tuesday nights. 
The program consists of papers, readings from drug journals and debates. 
These meetings offer opportunities to the students to become acquainted with 
many problems that come up in after life and the new development of phar- 
macy of today, which are not taken up in the class room. There is no class 
that means quite so much as this training does after leaving school ; for here 
one learns to speak in public, and to express his own thoughts, and, besides, 
he learns the ideas of his fellow-classmates. Besides these there are many 
invited speakers from the faculty, State Board men, doctors and pharmacists 
of the city to speak upon new opportunities and the great development in the 
field of pharmacy. 

Every member having a good record of attendance and activity during 
the two years will at the close of his senior session, receive a certificate of 
distinction. 



164 




Jlebical College of Uirgmia 



RICHARD N. LANIER Director 

R. N. LANIER. Cornet 

J. T. TAYLOR Cornet 

L. J. FARLEY Drums 

R. A. GAY Clarinet 

HARRY LYONS Mandolin 

E. S. WHITE Baritone 

HERBERT COHN Pianist 



165 




i66 



iHasionic Club 




PRESIDENT 
W. H. WHITMORE, 14° Asheville Perfection No. 1 

VICE-PRESIDENT 
R. L. CREEKMUR • ■ ■ Lake Drummond No. 178 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 
J. H. GARY, 32° DeWitt Clinton Consistory 

TILER 
L. H. MAYNARD • ■ . Henry Clay No. 6 

MEMBERS 

B. S. Burks, 9° Bedford Chapter No. 60 

W. C. Curtis Richmond No. 10 

W. R. Gardner ■ ■ . Fulton No. 193 

J. T. Graham Phythagoras No. 239 

J. C. Hopkins Tazewell No. 62 

A. M. Hitt Entered Apprentice 

R. R. Jones • Walnut Cove No. 629 

W. I. Knight ■ • Franklin No. 151 

H. W. Kline, 32° ■ Dalcho Consistory 

H. B. Luttrell Washington No. 78 

J. W. Lewis Belvidere No. 60 

R. N. Lanier Fredericksburg No. 4 

H. J. Langston . • ■ ■ • ■ Wake Forest No. 282 

W. B. McCutcheon Entered Apprentice 

C. Moorman Fellow Craft 

J. P. Norman Entered Apprentice 

A. D. Ownbey Sandy Valley No. 17 

T. C. Sheridan Sheffield No. 628 

S. Weinstein Randolph No. 19 

J. W. WiUiamson Saint Paul's No. 541 

R. S. Wingfield • ■ North Side No. 262 

E. S. White Relief No. 431 

167 




i68 



JSortl) Carolina Club 



OFFICERS 

J. E. SMITH... President 

F. M. AYCOCK Vice-President 

J. G. LYERLY ■ • . Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Ashworth, O. O. 
Aycock, F. M. 
Barnett, O. G. 
Boaz, T. D. 
Boseman, Dewey 
Burns, J. E. 
Clarke, Robert 
Cozart, S. R. 
Edwards, R. H. 



Grady, E. C. 
Horton, H. Z. L. 
Jones, J. C. 
Lyerly, J. G. 
Martin, J. L. 
Mebane, W. M. 
Medlin, E. M. 
Moore, F. H. 



Mitchell, Z. P. 
McCutchen, W. B. 
Sherrod, W. B. 
Smith, J. E. 
Smith, J. A. 
Tyree, J. C. 
Walker, D. V. 
Whittaker, P. F. 



169 




170 



^otitjttjegt "Virginia Club 

OFFICERS 

L. R. PAINTER President 

R. F. GILLESPIE • • Vice-President 

MISS C. O. HALLER. ...... Secretary-Treasurer 



Bond, W. R. 
Cecil, A. G. 
Cress, H. G. 
Delp, C. M. 
Derr, O. B. 
Gillespie, R. F. 
Grinstead, C. P. 
Haller, Miss C. O. 
Haller, J. A. 
Hornberger, I. T. 
Hopkins, J. C. 
Hargis, W. J. 



MEMBERS 
Irwin, C. M. 
Jackson, R. C. 
Jennings, G. N. 
Johnson, G. W. 
Keys, Joe 
Kirby, K. H. 
Litz, J. E. 
Lyons, Miss T. 
Lyons, H. 
Lyle, G. W. 
Mann, E. L. 



Martin, J. L. 
Moore, F. H. 
Painter, L. R. 
Polly, C. P. 
Remine, J. C. 
Rose, E. K. 
Stein, R. H. 
Thomas, J. G. 
Tipton, J. A. 
Witten, E. B. 
Williams, D. S. 



171 




172 



^^itijmonb College Clutj 



OFFICERS 

A. M. KIMBROUGH President 

W. E. DICKERSON Vice-President 

F. J. CASALDUC Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Ashworth, O. O. 
Barksdale, I. S. 
Beazley, W. S. 
Bums, J. E. 
Caravati, C. M. 
Casalduc, F. J. 
Cheatham, A. B. 
Claud, H. G. 
Clements, F. J. 
Combs, F. 
Davis, J. M. 
Dickerson, W. E. 
Edmonds, J. F. 
Fox, P. R. 



Ham, T. J., Jr. 
Hornbarger, I. T. 
Harris, M. H. 
Holderby, C. E. 
Isaacs, R. H. 
Kimbrough, A. M. 
Knight, W. I. 
Liggan, L. S. 
Lewis, W. P. 
Loving, J. B. 
Luttree, H. B. 
Mickle, E. R. 
Michalko, J. E. 
Owens, W. I. 



Ozlin, W. J. 
Payne, W. R. 
Perlin, Louis 
Pearman, T. B., 
Russo, H. A. 
Seward, B. P. 
Shepherd, J. L. 
Shumate, J. K. 
Snead, L. O. 
Shotwell, H. Z. 
Stratford, A. L. 
Tucker, C. N. 
Wingfield, R. S. 



Jr. 



173 




174 



OTiUiam mh iWarp Club 

OFFICERS 

H. L. MITCHELL „ ., 

President 

A. D. OWNBEY „. „ 

••...•• Vice-President 

J.T.GRAHAM e 

1 secretary-Treasurer 



Batt, W. H. 
Bristow, O. A. 
Cobb, R. S. 
Doss, R. R. 
Edwards, R. N. 
Fox, P. G. 
Graham, J. T. 



MEMBERS 

Hoover, L. H. 
Kyle, R. S. 
Mitchell, H. L. 
Murry, D. O. 
Ownbey, A. D. 
Parsons, G. W. 
Perkins, C. E. 



Saunders, L. S. 
Shockley, E. N. 
Stuart, D. B. 
Taylor, D. B. 
Tipton, J. A., Jr. 
West, W. C. 



175 




Eanbolpf)=iilaton Clutj 

OFFICERS 

G. R. MALONEY. President 

CARLTON MOORMAN Vice-President 

R. L. CREEKMUR .Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Brown, E. H. Green, W. T., Jr. Sawyer, L. L. 

Coates, Jos. Kline, H. W. Smoot, F. P. 

Creekmur, R. L. Maloney, G. R. Tyler, G. C. 

Galderos, R. Moorman, Carlton Denny, Miss Lucy C. 



176 



:s:-i^^rv? 




M 



f 




lO^O 




?|ampben=^ibnep Club 

OFFICERS 

R. H. WOOD President 

H. A. WALL Vice-President 

A. A. WILSON Secretary- Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Atkinson, B. J. Putney, C. W. Wilkinson, E. M. 

Gillespie, R. F. Preston, Dr. R. S. Wilson, A. A. 

Goolsby, F. G. Wall, H. A. Wood, R. H. 



177 






^nibersiitp of "^irsinia Club 

OFFICERS 

CLAUDE STUMP ..... President 

HORACE ORLANDO BELL Vice-President 

JOHN KEWTON ROBERTSON Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Bell, Horace Orlando Kelly, Mason Powhatan Stump, Claude 

Delp, Coy McKenley Mabry, Leland Stanford Seawell, Hallie Chris 

Harlow, Thomas Lewis Martin, Alfred Newman Snead, George Holman 

Hening, Locksley Payne Robertson, John Kewton Williams, John Powell 



178 




I^oanoke College Club 

OFFICERS 

J. G. LYERLY .President 

C. M. IRWIN. Vice-President 

R. F. CLINE Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Cline, R. F. Nofsinger, C. D. Sommerdahl, H. F. 

Irwin, C. M. Robinson, J. C. Shawver, J. W. 

Lyerly, J. G. 



179 




OTagfjington anb Hee Clutj 



OFFICERS 

T. D. DAVIS President 

F. M. LEECH Vice-President 

H. I. PIFER Secretary- Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Burks, B. S. 
Davis, T. D. 
Hawkins, R. P., Jr. 
Hileman, S. P. 



Leech, W. M. 
Leech, F. M. 
Lowman, J. L. 
Lyons, H. 



Pifer, H. I. 
Trecisse, J. P. 
Wash, Dr. 



l8o 




^nigtjtsf of Columtiug 

OFFICERS 

T. W. PUMPHREY .President 

F. E. HINCHMAN Vice-President 

H. L. CARAVATI. . Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Britton, F. J. Farley, Leon Kane, E. J. 

Caravati, C. M. Hening, L. P. Russo, A. J. 

Caravati, H. L. Hinchman, F. E. Trecisse, Joseph 



i8i 




Coeb Club 



Steinmetz, Innis 
Baughman, Mary B. 
Gwyn, Alva 
Nolting, Margaret 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Segar, Cornelia 
White, Leta 
Denny, Lucy Chase 
Smithwick, Gladys 



Bogle, Kathleen 
Messenger, Doris 
Lynch, Mrs. A. W. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Cummins, Margaret Haller, Constance 



Lyons, Tillie 



Patterson, Myrtle 
Saunders, Hilda 
Varlet, F. M. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Varlet, Sedona 
Vincent, Ruth 



Bennett. Helen 
Savage, Margaret 



182 



^f\t Jfleas; 




RIENDSHIP, Love and Economy, and the greatest of these is 
,^ Economy. This is absolutely the oldest organization of its kind 
^J in the world. Other similar organizations date their time of 
origin by years, but the Fleas date theirs by centuries. 

This ancient society was founded by an ancient Egyptian in 
the great University of Egypt at the time Egypt was in the prime of her 
prosperity and the center of the education of the world. This man did not 
have magnetism nor the ability to draw men unto him in friendship and 
brotherly ties, so in his loneliness and solitude he planned an organization 
which should have Friendship, Love and Economy as the basic principles. 

At first the membership was limited to medical students, later the invita- 
tion was extended to dental students also, and those who belong are ever 
ready to aid a brother F. L. E. upon receiving the distress signal. 

Absolutely the oldest and greatest organization of its kind in the world, 
wherever you go you find a F. L. E. It is not the kind that crawls up your 
back and bites you under the shoulder, but F. L. E., Friendship, Love and 
Economy. You may go into church, theatre, school, college or anywhere, 
call "Yea, Brother," give the distress signal, and brothers will gather around 
and pat you on the back. 

It costs you nothing to get in and a lesson to get out. Your widow is 
promised nothing when you die, but Brothers will gather together from far 
and wide to mourn at your grave and place flowers thereon. 

To pass the initiation one must be a man of definite convictions and with 
the ability to be concise in all his speech. Remember the F. L. E., Friend- 
ship, Love and Economy, and the greatest of these is Economy. 



183 



^f)e Cucfeoo pirbg 



The cuckoo birds will come again to the accustomed place, 
And give these halls its wonted tone of parasitic grace, 
Though not a bird of all the flock will limp back here from war. 
They fat and sleek will hunt their seats, the cushioned seats of yore. 

The only hand they grasp with warmth is the upper hand of luck. 
The only enemy they fear is work that needs some pluck. 
In love and trade their eggs are laid, to hatch with other's blood. 
Who was it slipped, that once they shipped, with Noah in the flood? 

They almost sing in Autumn clothes, and pick the locks of Frats, 
They weep along at final grades of brain composed of fats. 
But weep or sing, they still will cling — Why waste we useful words, 
While Master Fate swings wide the gate for damned and useless birds! 



^ 



184 




WHO SAID "DISPENSARY"? 



185 




OF THE OLD SCHOOL 



1 86 



l^fje 33atient ^peafeg 



I would like to be a Doctor 
At a nurse's training school, 

Because I may be crazy, 
But I ain't no fool. 

He goes out to see his girl 
And gets kisses by the score, 

When he returns he's met by the nurse, 
And gets a dozen more. 

Don't think I'm always sleeping 

Just because I snore; 
For a telescope is nothing, 

To a crack behind the door. 

She met him at the stairway. 

It was a pretty sight; 
And there he took the kisses. 

Under an electric light. 

She gives to him sweet kisses. 
More delicious than wine or malt, 

While she only gives to me. 
Senna, Pods and Salts. 

But I am like a Mason, 

What I see I never tell; 
But would advise to be more careful. 

Others might not do so well. 

Astronomers may use a telescope 
To read the stars and explore; 

But damn a telescope, for me. 
Give me a crack behind the door! 



187 



3n Appreciation of 0\ix Artis^ts; 



E. J. KANE 
HERBERT COHN 
L. F. HENING 

J. A. AVRACK 
S. H. CHANNING 

F. E. HINCHMAN 



i88 



A TRAGEDY IN ONE SCENE 

The Cast 

Ethyl Alcohol A fascinating siren 

Methyl Alcohol A vamp 

A. Souse The victim 

Prohi A policeman 

Time: — Midnight, January 16. 

Place: — Any cabaret, anywhere. 

Souse — Well, Ethyl, you say you'll leave me, never to return! Can this be 
true? Speak to me, dear for you I ever yearn. 

Ethyl — About a year ago I was queen. Prohi then spoke to me in accents 
mean. "Old girl," he said, "your race is almost run. Down through the 
ages you have had your fun. Men all have fought for you, drank of 
your pleasures, sacrificed children, home, all of their treasures. Now 
you must leave. Go, woman, go. If in a month in this place you are 
found, what will become of you that you well know. In government 
keeping you soon will be bound." 

Souse — Ethyl, my darling, what shall I do ? When your flaming red hair and 
bright colors I view, my senses all swim, my brain is awhirl, I never can 
lose you, sweet Ethyl, my girl. Could Prohi be serious in stopping your 
race? I fear that, alas, there'll be worse in your place. 

Ethyl — I know you loved me well dear Souse, but now they've closed up our 
old house. The barroom where we used to drink, is now quite sadly on 
the blink. The mirror in the old saloon is frosty as a winter moon. Good 
bye, my friend, a last good bye, the hour when I must leave is nigh. 

(As the clock strikes 12 :00 Ethyl goes through the revolving door. As 
it twirls there enters Methyl, the sinister vamp. She gives Souse the eyeball 
and he beckons to her.) 

i8g 



Souse — Who, then, are you? But for your color, than sinister hue, there's 
something of Ethyl that beckons through you. Ah, me, she is gone, I'm 
sad and alone ; if there's none to replace her I'll have to go home. 

Methyl — Let me take her chair; this gown that I wear, is one that dear Ethyl, 
before she was gone, would wear at the times that the men loved her so ; 
its sparkle would catch them and soon they were won. 

Souse — Yes, come to me now, I'll love you I vow. When you look at me so, 
it is Ethyl I see. Your mouth is like her's, your aroma the same. They've 
taken her, sent you ; then I'm not to blame. 
(He seizes Methyl and embraces her.) 

Methyl — You like me then, do you? Well, fool, you are lost. Who embraces 

Methyl should first ask the cost. 

(She leaves him.) 
Souse — Ye Gods, what is this! The world's growing dark. The lights all 

grow dim ; I'll pay for this lark ! I'm burning inside my heart is afire. 

Ah! Ethyl! Foul Methyl! You've killed my desire. 

(Enter Prohi.) 

Prohi — What's this, I fear there's been foul play. Who seeks to spoil our 
holiday? Up, man! Have you not heard that Water is our king. Get 
up and dance. Shout, man, and sing. 

Souse (weakly) — What? Sing without Ethyl? That I never could do. You 
drove her away and my death's due to you. 'Twas you left me Methyl, 
her poisonous twin. Think, Prohi, think! On you is the sin. 

Prohi — No ! No ! You can't say that. For they were devils both. To see them 
gone the world is nothing loth. You lusted for them; yours, then the 
shame. For your death you, sir, are alone to blame. 



igo 




igi 



X-RSY' /-^-^l 








$art ^layth hv tJje Jlebical College of l^irginia 
in tlje l^ecent l^orlb Wav 

^DRE than fifty of its faculty have been commissioned in the Army, 
the Navy, or United States Public Health Service, and have been 
on active duty with the military forces wherever their services 
1 were most needed. About one-half of its medical graduates of 
the class of 1917 and 1918 received commissions in the Navy, and 
a large number of the remaining half were commissioned in the Medical 
Corps of the Army. In the early part of the past session a unit of the 
Students' Army Training Corps was established at the college and 129 were 
enrolled in its ranks. 

Under the leadership of its President, Dr. Stuart McGuire, Red Cross 
Base Hospital No. 45 was organized as the Medical College of Virginia Base 
Hospital. The staff of this base hospital was composed, with few exceptions, 
of the members of the faculty and alumni of the college. The services ren- 
dered in France to the sick and wounded of the Army can be inadequately 
estimated only. The hospital cared for 18,000 patients. In recognition of 
the services rendered the French civilians, the French government bestowed 
upon its commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart McGuire, their 
Medaille d'Honneur. 

Under the command of Major C. Howard Lewis, Ambulance Company 
No. 319 was organized, and has been rendering constant service in caring 
for the wounded in France. 

At the beginning of the war, the War Department recognized the need 
for Roentgenologists to man the X-Ray Departments of the Base Hospitals, 
the medical organizations in camps and to work with the forces at the front. 
Nine schools of instruction were organized. One of these was placed under 
the command of the Dean of the School of Medicine, Major Alfred L. Gray, 
at the Medical College of Virginia. Thirty-one officers of the Medical Reserve 
Corps and in addition non-medical technicians for carrying on this work were 
trained at the Richmond School of Roentgenology. 



192 




193 



tlTfje iWebital College of Virginia 



HE Medical College of Virginia was founded in 1838 as a depart- 
ment of Hampden-Sydney College. In 1854, however, it was 
chartered as a separate school. Up to the time of its organiza- 



WSj&/ 

S^^i^Kr tion. Southern students of medicine who desired a regular course 
T^ n't\ of Study flocked to the Northern cities. At the approach of the 
Civil War, the Southern students at Philadelphia came to Richmond. To 
meet the demands thus made upon it, the Faculty, in exchange for funds to 
increase the hospital facilities, deeded its property to the State of Virginia. 

During the war the Medical College of Virginia was the only medical 
school in the South that did not close its doors. By holding two sessions 
each year, it was able to supply to the army the necessary staff of surgeons. 

In later years it has kept well in the front rank of medical colleges in 
America, and has always maintained its high standing. 



Clje ^nibergitp College of jWebicine 

The University College of Medicine was founded in 1893 by a score of 
Richmond physicians, under the leadership of Dr. Hunter McGuire. The 
College rapidly developed, extended its plant, drew students in large numbers 
from a wide area, and soon attained a high position among medical colleges. 

On the morning of January 6, 1910, the main College building was com- 
pletely destroyed by fire. The hopes of years seemed blasted, but the loyalty 
and determination displayed by the Faculty, Trustees and students won the 
sympathy and admiration of the citizens of Richmond, who contributed more 
than $100,000.00 for a new building. 

The magnificent new structure, which was formally opened on May 22, 
1912, is a model of completeness, and has been furnished with every facility 
for the most advanced methods in medical education. Its lecture rooms are 
well lighted and ventilated, and are provided with the latest designs of chairs 
for comfortably seating the classes. The laboratories are spacious, and are 
flooded with soft light from large windows which form more than one-half 
of the outside walls. They are provided with the latest designs of fixtures, 
are supplied with drawers and lockers for apparatus, and, where needed, with 
water, gas and electricity. Everything has been provided that would con- 
tribute to the convenience of the student and to thoroughness and efficiency 
in teaching. 



194 



CJe iWemorial Jlogpital 



The Memorial Hospital, now the property of the Medical College of 
Virginia, was founded by a group of citizens of Richmond under the leader- 
ship of Mr. John L. Williams. It was designed as a charity for the relief 
of the sick and for the advancement of medical education. 

In the early part of 1913 the trustees of the Memorial Hospital, the 
operation of which had been continuously under the control of the Medical 
College of Virginia, most generously presented this magnificent hospital to 
the consolidated schools, so that it is now an integral part of the institution, 
and under the exclusive management of the Board of Visitors of the Medical 
College of Virginia. This munificent gift was made with the full assurance 
that the purposes for which this hospital had been constructed would be fully 
executed. 

The Memorial, Hospital is a modern and admirably equipped institution 
of 180 beds, and has been granted a substantial yearly donation by the State 
of Virginia toward the expenses of the treatment of the indigent people of 
the State. 

In addition to the spacious wards the west wing of the Hospital consists 
of three floors of attractive rooms for the care of private patients of members 
of the staff. This wing is separated from the wards by the centrally placed 
administrative department, making it a complete private pavilion. 

In 1916, following increasing demands upon the facilities of the Hospital, 
the people of Richmond publicly subscribed a quarter of a million dollars for 
new buildings. With this most generous contribution four buildings are 
now under construction to be ready for occupancy in September, 1920, namely : 
the negro building, the Dooley isolation building, a central heating plant and 
an ambulance garage. 

The Negro Hospital consists of seven stories and basement. It is of 
fireproof construction throughout, with steel frame, hollow tile partitions, 
reinforced-concrete floors, and brick and limestone exterior. Large fireproof 
porches, with easy iron stairways from the top floor to the ground, serve the 
double purpose of furnishing opportunity for fresh air treatment and of 
egress from every part of the building in case of fire. The capacity of the 
hospital is 138 beds, arranged in wards of twelve beds, rooms of two beds, 
and single rooms. A new feature to be developed is a training school for 
colored nurses. 

The Dooley Isolation Hospital will be used exclusively for the treatment 
of crippled and deformed children. It consists of three stories and base- 
ment and is of the most improved fireproof construction. It has a capacity 
of thirty-six beds, arranged in rooms of two beds, and wards of four beds. 
This orthopedic building is a complete hospital in itself and will fill a long- 
felt want in a community that, like so many other cities, has had only the 
most inadequate means in the past for treating this special class of patients. 

195 



E\)t Vimnia ?|ogpital 



The close relation of the College to the community from which it has 
already received such loyal support has recently been still further emphasized 
by the establishment of a municipal hospital in the Virginia Hospital building 
directly adjoining the main building of the College. 

This hospital, which was formerly the teaching institution of the Uni- 
versity College of Medicine in its clinical branches, is now entirely under the 
control of the City of Richmond, and provides free treatment for both white 
and colored patients. The staff of this hospital, with a few exceptions, is 
appointed from the faculty of the Medical College of Virginia. 

Co-operation between College and City is now practically complete. In 
the dispensaries of the out-patient department the ambulant sick are treated 
and provided with drugs absolutely free of charge, while on the same block 
in a building in direct communication with the College property, the more 
seriously ill are provided with expert care and attention. The hospital wards 
accommodate 240 patients, and as the beds of this institution never lack 
occupants, an abundance of clinical material is always assured. Training 
in emergency work is furnished by an automobile ambulance service in charge 
of members of the resident house staff who are appointed by the College. 
Operations, to which the students are admitted, are conducted by the staff 
of the Hospital. 



l^fje Greater jHebical College of ^irsinia 

The new Medical College of Virginia continues the work of the Uni- 
versity College of Medicine and the Medical College of Virginia, which 
effected a consolidation in 1913. The institution happily combines the re- 
sources, teaching facilities and traditions of both of the medical colleges in 
Richmond, backed by the goodwill and moral support of the entire com- 
munity, and is under the auspices of the State of Virginia. Richmond has 
been a center of medical education for more than three-quarters of a century, 
influencing profoundly the practice of medicine throughout the Nation by 
physicians trained in its schools. 

ig6 







ST. PHILIP'S HOSPITAL 




ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL 




S^ 



MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 



197 




DO YOU REMEMBER THIS? 



igS 



examinations 




XAMINATIONS are of many kinds, being used for practically 
every conceivable purpose, and no well-regulated family can 
afford to be without one. The principal kinds are eugenic, civil 
service, and X-ray examinations. Among the chief causes of their 
existence at present is to discover hookworms, and find out how 
much wayward students are capable of cramming one day, writing the next, 
and forgetting the third. 

It is this last-mentioned type that causes so much sorrow and wrecks 
so many homes. The kind put out at the Medical College of Virginia fall 
in this category, and are of an advanced type, invariably producing much 
weariness of the flesh and an undue amount of profanity. At one time, when 
students were crude, examinations were thought to be extremely serviceable, 
but in our modern age of college life, with its different kinds of hops and 
other enlightening features, we are glad to note that this delusive idea is 
fast dying away, and it is earnestly hoped that this pernicious practice will 
be stopped before another generation appears on the scene. 



199 








ilaments( of a Junior iHeb, 

E READ our surgery until the wee hours of the morn, 
Our medicine we study until the pages are worn, 
In O. B. we gather the facts from every civilized land. 
The physical diagnosis, Garnett, please help us to understand. 
The nervous and mental we can probably get under Tucker and Gale, 
But we have subjects not mentioned on which we can't get bail. 
When LaRoque discloses the fact that what we read is all bunk, 
And proceeds with the modern way to amputate the lump, 
Tompkins emphasizes that the text is good for State Board exam. 
But if we dream of passing him, something else we must cram. 
It seems as if every book we have is giving us the wrong dope, 
And the text treatment for everything is old and not the new hope. 
So we wish this year no new discoveries will make their way to light. 
Or the hair will be pushed right off our beans, our heads will be crammed so 

tight. 
A draw! Good Luck! A Royal High! May Hoyle always be up to date! 














-J^/K 





PIPE DREAMS OF ANATOMY 



THSKIU 




and BONES 



Published Weekly by the Student Body of The Medical College of Virginia 



^feull anb ponesi 




T IS perhaps wise to begin any scientific treatise with a classifica- 
tion of the material to be studied. All skulls are divided into 
two classes : those that contain brains and those that don't. Most 
medical students have skulls of the latter variety. They use 
these for purposes of study, of course. Members of our Faculty 

have skulls with brains in them. They are utterly useless and will not be 

discussed. 

The skull is made up of bones, which is one reason there are so many 
boneheads. 

Bones may be also divided into two classes : Those that make us and 
those that break us. When we break the bones that make us we lose our 
means of support. When we make the bones that break us roll over, we 
gain our means of support — in the City jail. The bones that make us are 
very important constituents of the two greatest mysteries of the world — 
women and hash. 

There is another kind of bone which makes us laugh. Some of these 
will be found in the following pages. 



n 



^ 
■^ 




203 



Sokes 

'A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the wisest men. 



COPYRIGHT 

When Rastus Johnsing's son arrived, 
He looked just like his poppy, 
In fact the doctor done declared 
He was a carbon copy. 



,^J.^ 



PARLOR 




SIGNS OF THE TIMES 

"Manicure Parlor. What's that?" 
"That a swell name for a hand laundry." 

SO SAY WE ALL 

Do you feel a little shaky. 

Head and back a little achy; 

With creepy little chills arunning thru. 

Nose inclined to run and sneeze, 

A little wobbly in the knees? 

I'll say you've got the Spanish Flu. 




ANOTHER ERROR 

Customer: "Look here, I bought a bot- 
tle of your hair restorer last week, and all 
I've got for using it is a couple of large 
bumps on my head." 

Druggist: "Good gracious, I must have 
given you a bottle of our Bust Developer 
by mistake." 



■■■Mm 




A CONTINGENCY 

"The early bird will catch the worm. 
Of that there is no question; 
But if the worm should chance to turn. 
He'd get the indigestion." 

DIDN'T FAZE THE DOC 

"You need more exercise, my man." 
"Exercise, Doctor? I'm a piano lifter." 
"Eh! Well, hereafter lift two at a time." 



204 



A GOOD INVESTMENT 

I bought a bunch of flowers 
And placed them by my side, 
Before two days had drifted by 
I found that they had died. 

I bought a lot of oil stock, 
It was my joy and pride. 
Before a year had drifted by 
I found it, too, had died. 

I bought a pair of rabbits, 
The last thing that I tried. 
Next year I had six twenty-two. 
Ye Gods! they multiplied. 




CUTE WILLIE 

Willie got some Paris green. 
Dropped it on the soup tureen. 
Mother laugher outright in glee, 
"Ain't he smart at Chemistry?" 

DARN IT 

The throat specialist exhibited his laryn- 
goscope to a nervous woman and re- 
marked : 

"You would be surprised to know how 
far down we can see with this instrument." 

And then, as he was about to place the 
laryngoscope in her throat, she apologized 
for having a hole in her stocking. 



A CLINICAL REPORT 

(Found on a piece of paper in a chart 
room in the Virginia Hospital) 

"Symptomatology. — Respiration rising 
to 65 and then suddenly suspended. Face 
is flushed, the eyes are glazed and half 
closed. There is obviously a subnormal 
reaction to external stimuli. A fly upon 
the ear is unnoticed. The auditory nerve 
is anesthetic. There is a swaying of the 
whole body and an apparent failure of co- 
ordination, probably the effect of some 
disturbance in the semi-circular canals of 
the ear. The hands tremble and then 
clutch wildly. The head is inclined for- 
ward as if to approach some object on a 
level with the shoulder. The mouth stands 
partly open and the lips are puckered and 
damp. Of a sudden there is a sound of a 
deep and labored inspiration, suggesting 
the upward curve of Cheynestokes breath- 
ing. Then comes silence for 40 seconds, 
followed by a quick relaxation of the 
whole body and a sharp gasp. 

"Diagnosis. — One of the internes has 
kissed a nurse." 




COUNTER PRESCRIBING 

Customer (in big store) : "Where is your 
Complaint department?" 

Salesgirl: "Complaint? The Patent Med- 
icine counter is three aisles to the right." 



205 



INSIDE DOPE 

Fare thee well, and, if forever. 
Large intestine, fare thee well! 
A physician says that I can 
Do without thee just as well. 
Furthermore, he says, without thee 
I shall live a longer life. 
Hurry with the anesthetic! 
Hasten with the carving knife! 
Soon, O useless large intestines. 
When the germ of age doth grow, 
You may meet with the appendix, 
That I lost some time ago ! 
In the wondrous realm of science 
Such astounding things befall. 
Soon it may become the fashion 
To have no inside at all. 

BRUSH IT 

He put his arm around her waist. 

The color left her check; 
But on the shoulder of his coat 

It stayed about a week. 

A QUERY 

If a cat leapt out of a window. 
And it killed her when she lit. 

Would a jury decide that the animal died 
With a Cat-a-leapt-ic fit? 




A MESSAGE FROM IRELAND 

"Moike! Moike! Wek up; it's time t' 
take y' insomnia medicine." 



THE REASON WHY 

She: "Why do they paint the inside of 
a chicken coop?" 

He : "To keep the hens from picking the 
grain out of the wood." 



AS USUAL 

"That Doctor is a regular human dyn- 
amo." 

"Yes; and when I came in contact with 
him, I myself, was highly charged." 

USUALLY 

"Doc, give me something for my head- 
ache." 

"Did you ever have headache before?" 
"Nope, usually after." 

HE KNEW ANATOMY 

Dr. Moon: "Mr. Cannon, what is the 
prognosis of Cystitis?" 

Cannon: "It runs along up the ureter, 
Doctor." 

WHY EXAMINERS COMMIT 
HARI KARI 

Question: Give emergency treatment 
for hemorrhage from the lungs. 

Answer: Apply tourniquet. 

Question: Describe the pelvic dia- 
phragm. 

Answer: The diaphragm does not go as 
low as the pelvis. 

Question: What are the pigmented 
spots developed by pregnant women 
called? 

Answer: Cloaca. 

IMPOSSIBILITY 

First Stude: "I had a peculiar dream the 
other night. I dreamt that I was in some 
peculiar place and then I woke up before 
I found out where I was. It must have 
been Hades." 

Second Stude: "How do you know it 
wasn't Heaven." 

First Stude. "Couldn't have been, 'cause 
I saw Miller and Straus before I woke up." 



206 



A PIKER 

Old Captain Kidd was a pirate bold 
Who sailed on the raging main; 

He made his victims walk the plank 
And ravaged the sea for gain. 

Now Old Cap Kidd had a lot to learn. 

An amateur kill-joy was he; 
As he killed and robbed and sailed away 

The scourge of the deep blue sea. 

A piker at killing joy was Kidd, 

A tyro not worth a damn; 
In all his career he never gave 

A chemistry exam. 




CAUSE OF SCARS 

"O, look at that scarred old hillside," 
exclaimed the gushing young thing. 

"Yes," said her prosaic companion. 
That's where it was operated on for 
gravel." 

SIGNS OF THE TIMES 

Sign on an apartment building: 

"No Children Allowed in This Building; 

All Deliveries Must Be Made in the Back 

Yard." 



A DREAM 

"I had a dream the other night," 

Said a stuaent to a man. 
'T went to the gates of Paradise 

And there I took my stand." 
St. Peter pushed the gates ajar 

And sang out, "Who are you?" 
I said, "I'm from M. C. V. 

Sent here by the Flu." 
And when the gates were opened 

And St. Peter let me past 
I realized I was safely home 

I'd gotten thru at last. 
But I had no sooner entered 

Than I quickly turned to go 
For seated on the judgment bench 

Was E. C. L. — you know. 
I gathered up my garments 

And prepared to quit the spot. 
"What's your hurry?" asked St. Peter, 

"Down below you'll find it hot. 
You're safely home, old man. 

You've passed beyond a doubt." 
" 'Tis no use to say I've passed," I said 

" ifOT E. C. L. will rule me out." 

THE PENALTY OF BLISS 

Her lips he kissed and cried, "Oh, bliss!" 
The maiden hissed, "You'll pay for this!" 
She spoke the truth. His fatal frolic 
Laid low the youth with painter's colic. 

CARELESS JACK AND JILL 

Jack and Jill went up the hill 
Like dutiful son and daughter; 

Now Jack has typhoid, Jill is ill — 
They didn't boil the water. 

Sheridan (to patient in Dispensary) : 
"Hey, you, what's your trouble?" 
Patient: "I've been shot. Doctor." 
Sheridan:" Where?" 
Patient: "In my back yard." 




207 



^0«R YEARS 
AT 




FIRST SIGNS OF SPRING 

The Spring has came 

The snow has went. 
It was not did 

By accident. 
The birds have flew, 

As you have saw. 
Back north again 

By nature's law. 

DISCOVERY 

A young western doctor has made the 
discovery that the ankle is placed between 
the foot and the knee in order to keep the 
calf away from the corn. Looks reason- 
able, doesn't it? 

YESTERDAYS 

Many the roads to yesterday. 
Roads that I used to know; 

One where the bar-keep at Murphy's 
Used to shake 'em up just so. 

At another one I falter 

As I pass by the open door 

It's heart-breaking now at Doyles' 
Where the schooners come no more. 

And at the corner of Ninth and Main 
Where they serve the food of the sea, 

The stuff they give you to wash it down 
Don't taste the same to me. 

Many the roads of yesterday 

But one thing alone is true 
You'll have to forget yesterdays 

'Tis near beer today for you. 



WHERE HE STRUCK 

Scholar: "Jimmy hurt himself diving 
last night." 

Teacher: "Did he strike the bottom?" 
Scholar: "No, ma'am, his stummick." 

ANOTHER DANGER 

Curtis: " 'Licker' Leech was operated 
on and a splinter removed from his throat." 

Miss Steinmetz: "How did he get it in 
his throat?" 

Curtis: "He had been drinking wood 
alcohol." 

WHERE DID HE GET IT? 

Fackenthall: "What liquid alkaloid have 
you been using recently?" 

Adams (who had just been smoking a 
cigarette, which we all know contains the 
alkaloid, nicotine) : "I don't know, sir, un- 
less it is alcohol." 

COLORED AILMENTS 

Yellow jaundice. 

White plague, 

Black measles. 

Blues, 

Roseola, 

Green apple quick-step, 

Pink-eye, 

Brown taste. 

Scarlet fever. 

A GOOD SIGN 

When is a man in his second childhood? 
When he goes upstairs in short pants. 











AVh.\t We Seldom See In Med. Profession 
208 



ITS FUNCTION 

The teacher was examining the class in 
physiology. 

"Mary, can you tell us," she asked, "what 
is the function of the stomach?" 

"The function of the stomach," the little 
girl answered, "is to hold up the petticoat." 



AT THE AUTOPSY 

Miss Cummings (to Doctor handling 
dead patient's lungs) : "Doctor, isn't that 
a liver?" 

Doctor: "Not by a long shot." 
Miss Cummings: "It sure is big enough 
and black enough to be one." 



POOR JOHNNY 

Johnny handed the following note from 
his mother to the teacher one morning. 

"Dere Teecher: You keep teUin' my 
boy to breathe with his diafram. Maybe 
rich children have got diaframs, but how 
about when their father only makes twoo 
dollars a day and has got five children to 
keep? First it's one thing, then it's an- 
other, and now it's diaframs. That's the 
worst yet." 

WOODCRAFT 

"What's your name, sir?" 

"Wood." 

"What's your wife's name?" 

"Wood, of course." 

"H-m; both wood. A-ah any kindling?" 

HE MUST SING BASS 

Dr. Christian (on a practical) : "Mr. Wil- 
son, how is the anatomy of the body 
divided?" 

Wilson: "Skull, which contains the 
brain; the thorax, which contains the heart 
and lungs, and the abdomen, which con- 
tains the vowels A, E, I, O, U, and some- 
time W and Y." 



SO KINDHEARTED 

Miss Cummings with patient in chair for 
extraction. Patient squirms. Miss Cum- 
mings: "Let Doctor see the tooth; Doctor 
won't hurt you." After strenuous efforts 
and the tooth is out. Miss Cummings pats 
patient on the shoulder and says: "Doctor 
almost made you cry." 




2og 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




MWtMHN n 



i Deli 



ICIOUS 



Nutritious 




Cream of Ice Creams 

WILL SOLVE all your entertaining problems, as its exceptional 
quality and uniform goodness is responsible for its unusual popularity. It 
lends itself to an unlimited variety of dainty and attractive ways of serving. 

Whether eaten at the fountain or at the home, there is enjoyment in 
every mouthful. Because it is demanded by thousands, THE VELVET 
KIND has rightfully earned the title "Cream of Ice Creams." 

Made from pasteurized cream and fresh fruits by experts every day, 
it is a dish of guaranteed freshness and purity. 



Van.lla 

Chocolate 

Strawberry 



Vanilla 
Chocolate 



CREAMS 

Pineapple 
Cherry Custard 
Grape Nut 



Caram. 
Peach 



Individual Bricks — Neapolitan Style — Three Flavors 



Strawberry 
Vanilla 

Cuts 24 to 32 to the gallon. 



Orange Ice 
Chocolate 



individually wrapped 



SHERBETS 

Orange Pineapple Lemon 

FANCY MOLDS 
Of appropriate designs for weddings, holidays, anniversaries and all functions 

Purity Ice Cream Co. 



Richmond, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 



Suffolk, Va. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



TUCKER SANATORIUM 



INCORPORATED 



MADISON AND FRANKLIN STS. RICHMOND, VIRGINIA [ 



I^^BP^ "^^Hl 


Essm^M 


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jaiiBTr~.-TiirrftjiMa]^; .t-'^V-'f - 





The private sanatorium of Drs. Beverley R. Tuciter and R. Finley Gayle for the treatment 
of Nervous Disi 



Modernly conducted, including hydrotherapy, massage and electricity. Training school 
' ' for nurses including six months afEliation at the Johnston- Willis and Women's Hospitals. 

INSANE AND ALCOHOLIC CASES NOT TAKEN. 



1 #race hospital 

t 

I For the Surgical Patients 

1 of 

i 

{ Dr. Robert C. Bryan Dr. H. S. MacLean 

i 

= 401-7 WEST GRACE STREET 

I RICHMOND. VA. 












i 
i i 

i I 

1 i 

I 



I Compliments \ 

I J 

I of I 

1 ' • 

I Johnston- Willis Sanatorium \ 



I 1 

• • 

i i 

I I 

i ! 

1 i 

t i 



i I 



t. Xufee'g Hospital 

Owned and personally conducted by Dr. Stuart McGuire for the exclusive 
use of his private patients. 

Building erected for the purpose to which it is devoted and combines the 
comforts of a home with the conveniences of a modern hospital. 

Located in the residential section, convenient to all parts of the city by 
means of the street car service. 




DR. STUART McGUIRE'S PRIVATE SANATORIUM 

Capacity for eighty patients, single and double 
bedrooms, with or without bath, no wards. 

Designed for surgical and gynecological cases. 
No contagious diseases, insane or colored patients 
received. 

Cost of board and nursmg and other information 
will be obtained by addressing the Secretary. 



• RICHMOND 



VIRGINIA 



Stuart Circle Hospital 

Monument Avenue and Lombardy Street 




Extensive addition in course of construction 
including Offices for the Staff and additional 
rooms for the patients 



STAFF 



• Surgery : 

Stuart N. Michaux, M. D. 
Chas. R Robins, M. D. 



Medicine : 

Alex. G. Brown. Jr., M. D. 
Manfred Call, M. D. 

£pe. Ear, Nose and Throat: 
Clifton M. Miller, M. D. 
R. H. Wright, M. D. 



Roentgen Ray Depl-: 

F. M. Hodges, M. D., Director 
A. L. Cray, M. D., Consultant 

Pathological Dept.: 

Chas. Phillips, M. D., Director 

W. A. Shepherd, M. D., Consultant 

Superintendent: 

Miss R. Z. Van Vort, R. N. 



Obstetrics: 

Greer Baughman, M. D. 
B. H. Gray, M. D. 



Jas. K. Hall, M. D. Paul V. Anderson, M.D. E. M. Gayle, M.D. 

Westbrook 
Sanatorium 




The magnificent suburban home of the late Major Ginter, by alterations and extensive 
additions, has been transformed into a private institution for the treatment of nervous diseases, 
mild mental cases and select alcohol and drug habitues. 

The grounds are ample, quiet is assured, and a new building for men makes easy the 
separation of the sexes. A number of cottages make possible satisfactory and congenial grouping. 

Rooms, single or ensuite, with or without private bath. 

Hot water heal, electric lights, artesian water. 

Bowling, tennis, croquet, billiards and a gymnasium afford recreation. 

Electrical and hydrotherapy equipment. 

Nurses and attendants trained for this special work. 

Two of the physicians reside in the institute and devote their entire time to the patients. 



RICHMOND -;- VIRGINIA 



THE HYGEIA 



I HOSPITAL AND SANATORIUM 



I RICHMOND, VA. 

! 

! Dr. J. Allison Hodges' Private Institution 

t For 

I 

1 Nervous and Medical Patients 

i 

j (No Insane nor Drug Addicts) 

I So far as known, every modern approved facility is offered for the Diagnosis and Treatment 
\ of Acute, as well as Chronic Medical and Nervous Patients, with special care in eliminating 
I objectionable cases. 

I Training School for Nurses, and Special Posi-Craduale Courses in Massage, Hydrotherapy,, 

• , Physical Culture, Etc. 

J 

i Two Resident Physicians Open the Entire Year 



DOCTORS! MAKE YOUR HEADQUARTERS WITH US 



t * 

I I 

» • 

! 

I 

• I 

I t 

I t 

! ! 

I • i 



Grant Drug Company 



\ 

\ ~ ~ i 

j TWO STORES ! 

I • 

t • 

t « 

1 Main and 12th Street Broad and 7th Street I 

• t 
t • 

{ BROAD STREET STORE OPEN ALL NIGHT 1 

• i 



»......--..--—. — ■---«-«—»- ..—...--■. — .^-^ 

• 




t 

t 


i 


SUPERIOR 


1 




FORD 

DAYLIGHT 


• 
( 
• 
! 


1 

i p ICHMOND 


SERVICE 


• 
1 




\ 

• 
• 

• 


1 rv MOTOR 


. CO., Inc. : 


1 Tenth and Broad RICHMOND 


Tel. Randolph 407 


1 

i ( LOCATION \ 

i ORGANIZATION ^ ; 

• EQUIPMENT 

I ( SERVICE I 

i 


If all 



If you want real clothes 

come, to 



BROAD AT SEVENTH ST. 



j McRAE CLOTHING CO. = 

t 1 



(STATE INSTITUTION) 



MEDICINE DENTISTRY PHARMACY 



New Buildings. Well-equipped Laboratories Under the direction of Full- 
Time Competent Teachers 



For full information and catalogue address 
J. R. McCAULEY, Secretary 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



Medical College of Virginia I 



The Memorial Hospital, Dooley Hospital, Colored Hospital, owned and controlled by the 
Medical College of Virginia, and offer every facility for thorough Clinical Teaching. ;, 
Staffs composed of the Faculty of the College. Addihonal Clinical Facilities are offered ;, 
through the Virginia Hospital, City Home, City Jail, etc. ^ 



The Jefferson 



RICHMOND VA. 




THE MOST MAGNIFICENT HOTEL IN THE SOUTH 

European plan 

Ideally situated in the most desirable section of 
Richmond. 

Every comfort for the tourist 

Every convenience for the traveling man 

Rooms single and ensuite, with or without bath. 

Rates $2.00 per day and upwards 

O. F. WEISIGER 

Manager 






/Bburpb^ 6 Ibotel 

(EUROPEAN PLAN) 

RICHMOND'S LARGEST AND MOST DISTINCTIVE HOTEL 














^i!«^ 



^s^ftl 



Located at the intersection of Broad and Eighth Streets 
It is on direct car Hne to all stations and in the heart of 
the theatrical and shopping district. 

SERVICE AND CUISINE UNEXCELLED 

THE ONLY HOTEL IN RICHMOND WITH ATTACHED GARAGE 



JAMES T DISNEY, President 



Hotel Richmond 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



:,. MOTEL i 
W i RICHMOND 




, . ^B^^Smxsxaumtc^.^.^ 


\ wmnn^'^^^''fWwWt^ n'^'-^'^^^M 


1^'f^^UBtVi — 


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FACING CAPITOL SQUARE 



Ninth and Grace Streets 



UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

STRICTLY FIREPROOF EUROPEAN PLAN 

Rates $2.CX) per day and upward 



ROOF GARDEN 
W. E. HOCKETT, 
Manager 



DANCING 
S. B. VALENTINE. 
Asst. Manager 




The Secret Behind 



FLOWERS 



of Guaranteed 



1 Freshness 



? Each day we cut flowers from under a vast expanse of 240,000 

* feet of glass. These are the choice blooms which are used in 

I making up your orders. Artistic corsages packed by Hammond 

I are guaranteed to arrive in perfect condition. 



I CORSAGES-CUT FLOWERS-DECORATIONS 

I WE DELIVER ANYWHERE 

I 

? When flowers are to be sent the best arc none too good. The 

• assurance that your flowers will prove unusually lasting is worth 

A much to you. Hammond Flowers are always moderately priced. 



ASK FOR ESTIMATES 



HAMMOND 

THE SOUTH'S LARGEST FLORIST 

Telephone Madison 630 

109 EAST BROAD STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



PILLING FAUGHT BLOOD 
PRESSURE APPARATUS 





Have you had any trouble 
with any other make of Aneroid 
sphygmomanometer? Some have, 
but not those who use the Faught 
Pocket. Ask your confreres. 

16 Reasons 



I . There is no mechanical detail of practical value in any sphygomanometer 
which is not embodied in those of the Faught-Pilling make. In this apparatus you 
will find: 

2. A scale running to 300 mm. Hg. 

3. The scale graduated in millimeters requires no computation to determine the 
actual pressure. 

4. An adjustable dial which allows for changes in temperature and atmospheric 
pressure. 

5. The scale plainly marked in black and red on a white background — easy to 
read. 

6. The aneroid mechanism has four chambers, assuring absolute smoothness in 
operation. The same advantage as a "Six" auto over the old one or two cylmder. 

7. The metal pump of convenient size is positively guarded by an air-tight valve. 

8. A reliable release valve is conveniently placed on the shank of the pump. 

9. The arm-band is standard width (5 inches) and of sufficient length to meet all 
requirements. 

10. The pressure bag measures 9x5 inches. 

1 1 . The outer fabric of the arm-band is of washable material and permits easy 
sterilization. 

12. Arrangement for quick removal of the pressure bag from the outer covering 
for cleaning and other purposes, 

13. An attractive leather case which holds the gauge, arm-band and pump, and is 
of convenient size to fit in the pocket. 

14. Permanent accuracy which has been demonstrated by thousands of satisfied 
users working under all conditions during a number of years. 

15. The Faught Apparatus is in general use by thousands of physicians, by the 
U. S. Government, many life insurance companies and research laboratories, as the 
standard of accuracy. 

16. Not a spring instrument. 

Price complete, mith arm-band inflating pump, in durable Morocco case, $22.50 net 
Signed Certificate and a copy of Faught's Primer on Blood Pressure with every Apparatus 

Made only by George P. Pilling & Son Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
FOR SALE BY 

POWERS & ANDERSON 

503 East Main Street, Richmond, Va. 



We wish you every success in 
your chosen profession 



I what you will need. 

I 
I 

1 Powers ^ Anderson, Inc. 

I 

\ Surgical InstJ'uments, Hospital Supplies, etc. 

603 E. Main Street, Richmond, Va. 



J tflT \A7ViPn ^7nn \nT^r\i- i/mir firmi-nmpnf f 

I 



^ When you want your equipment 

apply to us. i 

I 



i ^ We can supply you with everything \ 

f \ 

j you need, on the most reasonable j 

i terms. I 

1 ' 1 

\ €| All you have to do is make your- j 

j self known to us and give us a list of • 



I 

1 1^ I 

\ j 

j Powers &' Anderson Dental Co., Inc. | 

i Dental Supplies and Equipment | 

I 603 E. Main Street, Richmond, Va. \ 

I t 

I I 

I Powers ^ Anderson Surgical Instrument Co. i 

i INCORPORA TED | 

I No. 2 Arcade Building, Norfolk, Va. j 

• • 

j • 

I I 

I t 






Whittet and 
Shepperson 



College and Commercial 

Qrintmg 



11-15 North Eighth Street 
Richmond, Va. 






(INCORPORATED) 
503 East Main Street, Richmond, Va. 



D 



DEALERS IN 



Dental Supplies, Furniture, Fixtures 

Gas Outfits 

Electrical Equipments, Etc. 



WE CARRY THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK OF TEETH, 
CROWNS AND FACINGS IN THE SOUTH. UP-TO-DATE SAMPLES OF 
COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITS ALWAYS ON HAND. 



Your Inspection Invited and Patronage Solicited 
Branches 



VOSE DENTAL CO. I 



f 
\ 

\ 

NORFOLK DENTAL DEPOT ROANOKE DENTAL DEPOT j 

Norfolk, Va. Roanoke, Va, | 

• 

CAROLINA DENTAL DEPOT » 

Charlotte, N. C. | 

• 



St. Elmo 

BILLIARD PARLOR 



Under Lyric Theatre, 9th and Broad Streets 
where the crowds go. 

You are always welcome. 

CHAS. FLACCOMIO 

Manager 




Clje 

IRecreation 

PIETSCH BROS. 

Proprietors 




18 BILLIARD AND POCKET BILLIARD TABLES 
7 BOWLING ALLEYS 

CORNER 4TH AND BROAD 

FINEST RECREATION CENTER IN THE STATE 
A PLACE OF REFINEMENT 

Where Gentlemen Meet Their Friends 

Tables or Alleys Reserved for Ladies 

PHONE RANDOLPH 541 

H. W. McFARLAND GEO. HERBERT 



Ma 



Assistant Manager 



BOYS, WE ARE WITH YOU 

LET US PROVE IT 




707 EAST BROAD STREET 

RICHMOND VA. 

Clothing direct from FACTORY to YOU 

Money Back Guarantee 

Fifth Avenue Models — Style Creators 

$25.00 UP AT A SAVING OF $10.00 TO $20.00 
ON EVERY SUIT OR COAT YOU BUY 



Compliments 

of 



Jake Wells Theatres 

o/ RICHMOND, VA. 






Mellin's Food 



is a dry, soluable powder made from wheat and malted barley 
and is to be used with fresh cow's milk. 

When Mellin's Food is added to fresh milk, it softens the 
curd, making it Hght and digestible, and supphes the carbo- 
hydrates and other elements to make up the deficiency of these 
constituents in cow's milk. 

The resulting mixture resembles mother's milk both in composi- 
tion and digestibility, and furnishes a food based upon principles 
consistent with scientific teachings. 

MELLIN'S FOOD COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASS. 









Daley's 

MARSHALL AT TENTH ST. 



ror your 

PERIODICALS, Confections, 
Delicatessens, Stationery, 
Supplies, Cigars and 
Tobaccos 

PHONE RANDOLPH 5007 



I 
I 



Haskins' 
Billiara Parlor 

8^4 East Broad Street 
10 Tables 



illllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllliliiiiiiiiliiilllllillllllllllliiliiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiilililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiiii r 

lllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiniilliliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



^J/^OU spend most of your 
J- time in your office. An 
office properly arranged and 
equipped will be an inspira- 
tion for your development. 
Our Department for Office 
Planning and suggestions for 
Office Arrangement is always 
at your service. 



llllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiliiiilliillillllllliiiliiiiiiiiliniiiiiiiliiiiliiiii^^ I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mill iiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiii 

RiTTER Dental Mfg. Co., Inc. 

Rochester, New York 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiillllllllllllllliiliiiiiiillliilliiillliliililllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitt^ nil mill Ill u 




HARVARD CHAIR 

Will not only meet all the requirements 
of an efficient and serviceable dental 
chair, but its beauty will add to the 
attractiveness of your office and its com- 
forts will appeal to your patients 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

THE HARVARD COMPANY 



CANTON, OHIO, U. S. A. 



LISTERINE 

A Non=Poisonous, Unirritating, Antiseptic Solution 



Agreeable and satisfactory alike to the Physician, Surgeon, Nurse 
and Patient. Listerine has a wide field of usefulness, and its unvary- 
ing quality assures like results under like conditions. 



As a deodorizing antiseptic lotion 
As a gargle, spray or douche 

As a mouth-wash-dentifrice 



TTie freedom of Listerine from possibility of poisonous effects is a 
distinct advantage, and especially so when the preparation is pre- 
scribed for employment in the home. 



LAMBERT PHARMACAL COMPANY 

ST. LOUIS, MO., U. S. A. 



As a Wash and dressing for wounds j 



! 

♦ 

I 

J 

Operative or accidental wounds heal rapidly under a Listerine dress- j 

ing, as Jts action does not interfere with the natural reparative t 

Processes. t 



The Official Photographer 

for 



W. W. FOSTER 

112 North Ninth Street 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Nothing missing but the --voice 










SCIENTIFIC 

not 

EMPIRICAL 

Remove the Antiphlogistine dress- 
ing at the end of twelve hours and 
examine it. The center will be 
wet provided there is an inflamed 
area beneath it; an outer zone 
merging into the center will be 
moist, and the part which has 
covered healthy tissue will be 
comparatively dry. 




In the outer zone the blood is flowing 
freely and uninterruptedly through the 
underlying vessels, forming a current 
directed away from Antiphlogistine. 
Its liquid contents therefore follow the 
direction of least resistance and enter 
the circulation through the physical 
process of endosmosis. In the center 
zone there is stasis, no current tending 
to overcome Antiphlogistine's hygro- 
scopic property. The point of least 
resistance for the liquid exudate is 
therefore in the direction of Antiphlo- 
gistine - exosmosis is going on in the 
zone, hence the excess of moisture. 

Osmotic boolilel will be 
sent FREE upon request. 



The Denver Chemical Mfg. Company 

NEW YORK, U. S. A. 



Cottrell & Leonard 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
^M^aJ^ers and Renters 

of 

Caps, Gowns, Hoods 

to 

AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 




American 
Mutual Drug Co., Inc. 

Manufacturing Druggists 
RICHMOND, VA. 

104 Governor St. Phone Mad. 5637 



Distributor for Great American 
Chemical Products Co. 

A full line of U. S. P. and N. F. 
Tinctures, Elixirs, Syrups, etc. 









c □, Randolph 4646 

Store Phones R^„j„|p,, 4547 

Offiee Phone, Randolph 3108 



POWERS-TAYLOR 
DRUG CO. 

Wholesale Druggists, Importers 
and Jobbers of Druggists' Sun- 
dries and Fancy Goods. 

9, 11, 13, 15 and 17 South 13th Street 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Agents for Walrus Soda Fountains 



Let Tailors Master 
Your Clothes 

We understand the very 
Essence of Them 



Grace Cleaning Works 

Dyers and Tailors 

31 1 N. Laurel Street 
Between Broad and Grace Streets 



Phone Randolph 5961 



,.—.,....4. 



TRAGLE'S 

The Prescription Drug Store 



Purest Drugs and Chemicals 
Serums and Antitoxins 



Tragle Drug Co., Inc. 



817 EAST BROAD STREET 









i t 



SPARK'S 
CIGAR STORE 



Dealer m 

FINE CIGARS 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

TOBACCO 

Agents for 

PARK & TILFORD'S 
CANDIES 

BROAD AT 8TH STREET 

RICHMOND, VA. 






■f— • 
( 



Compliments 
of 

TKe Stone Motor Co. 

(Inc.) 

RICHMOND, VA. 

D 

Buick - Locomobile 
Hahn J^rucks 



j 
I 



i When your Ford Car Suffers from 

j Nervous Breakdown or any other Auto ? 

• Disease you should carry il to a Repu- ? 

I lable Ford Physician. 

OUR FORD HOSPITAL AT 
101 2 WEST BROAD ST. 

IS OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 

We Guarantee the Recovery of all Ford 
Patients 

Our Prices are Standardized 



Universal Motor Co. 

(Inc.) 

Authorized Ford Dealers 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



The Professional Man requires Auto- 
mobile Supplies of unquestionable Depend- 
ability. Hundreds of Doctors and other 
members of the Professions have found 
the true character of quality in our Tires 
and Accessories. 

FURTHERMORE OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT 

"Ever\)thing for the Automobile" 

Virginia 
Auto Supply Co. 

Broad at Belvidere Street 
Richmond, Va. 

Phone Randolph 5896 



I 
1 



• — • . •■•••♦ 

i 
t 



FIRST-CLASS WORK 

CHILDREN'S HAIR CUTTING 

A SPECIALTY 

X 

Sal Cassatta 

Richmond's Leading Barber 



Lady Manicurist in Attendance 



909 EAST BROAD STREET 



Shepherd'j 



L. K. Shepherd, Prop. 



Fine Confection, Soda, Cakes 
French Pastries and Luncheon 



107 EAST BROAD STREET 






Phone Randolph 247 



Jefferson 
Pharmacy 



Herbert T. Ezekiel 

Printer of Everything 



2 SOUTH EIGHTH ST. 
KICHMOND, VA. 



-f ....... 



Fatory lo You 
Stores Coast to Coast 



United Hat Stores 

(INCORPORATED) 
Ttvo Stores in Richmond 



631 EAST BROAD STREET 
124 EAST BROAD STREET 



All the Latest 
Shapes and Styles 
Soft and Stiff Hats 
Straws and Panamas 
Cloth and Silk Caps 

See Window Display) 












®I|0 (Enlkg^ of Jill Imm mh iiary 



FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Thorough academic courses leading to the degrees of A. B., B. S., and M. A,; well- 
equipped laboratories and excellent health conditions, historic environment and intimate 
contact with the best ideals of Virginia. 

WILLIAM AND MARY IS ALSO THE STATE TEACHERS- 
COLLEGE FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Special Teacher's Training Courses. 

Course in Home Economics under the Smith-Hughes Act, Pre-Medical Courses, Pre- 
Electrical and Pre-Chemical Engineering Courses. Courses in Business Administration and 
Commerce. Courses for Commercial Teachers. 

State scholarships for those preparing to be teachers and superintendents. 

Loan fund for Virginia students. 

For particulars address: 

J. A. C. CHANDLER, President 

WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Our New Home 

at 906 E. Marshall St. is 50% 
larger and better than our old 
one. This means better print- 
ing, increased output, and larger 
service 

For more than a quarter of a 
century 

Beverley & Co. 

PRINTERS 

have been associated with this 
neighborhood, serving probably 
more physicians, druggists and 
hospitals than any similar con- 
cern. 

We will be glad to welcome 
the individual members of the 
present student body, when they 
enter business, at our new home. 

906 East Marshall St. 



Murphy's Hotel Barber 
Shop 

and Manicuring Parlor 

Hotel Richmond Barber 
Shop 

And Manicuring 



Ehmig's Barber Shop 

202 N. Seventh St. 



GEO. C. EHMIG. Prop. 



Harry" 



TWELFTH AND MARSHALL 

Eats 

Drinks 

Smokes 



Wells & Zack 



EXPERT BARBERS 



12th and Marshall Streets 



Special Attention to Students 
Give Us a Trial 



Mebane & Son 



12TH AND CLAY STREETS 



Everything for StuJeixts 



Stationery, Cigarettes, Cigars, 

Tobaccos and Drinks. 

Catch 'em between periods 



Pearl 
Laundry Co., Inc. 

6-8- 1 0-12 S. 12th Street 

SATISFACTION 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

Patronize the Laundry that appreciates 
your business, 

J. R. McCAULEY 

President